Gear up Alpha

Mentzel

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Draw three vertical lines on primary clutch sheave with sharpie. Ride for a day (make sure RPMs are hitting peak), then look at the lines for wear. If the lines are not completely worn off (belt riding to top of primary) gear down.

Keep gearing down in 2mph increments until you are using 100% of the clutches. This will take all factors including rider weight into account when setting gear ratio. You may need to add primary weight as your peak RPMs will start to increase. So add weight after you get max shift out. Once you add weight to reduce RPMs to peak you will feel a noticeable difference in acceleration.

After the top of the clutch gets broken in it will feel like you have gone from a 4 speed trans to a 10 speed trans in your pickup. Much smoother and sled will drive away easier in heavy snow loads. Belt life will also increase.

Photo is a Polaris but same works for cat..

 

kanedog

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A tractor will do a lot of work, but isn't that fun to drive on a daily basis.
Well, you have read and heard the results from a few excellent clutchers who are ahead of the game. But then you shoot down the information with a unrelated comparison.
It’s probably best that you keep thinking the antiquated clutching theory of 30 years ago. That way, us humans will make no progress, or you will anyways. Bahahahaha think outside the box boondocker, think outside the box.
 

kanedog

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Draw three vertical lines on primary clutch sheave with sharpie. Ride for a day (make sure RPMs are hitting peak), then look at the lines for wear. If the lines are not completely worn off (belt riding to top of primary) gear down.

Keep gearing down in 2mph increments until you are using 100% of the clutches. This will take all factors including rider weight into account when setting gear ratio. You may need to add primary weight as your peak RPMs will start to increase. So add weight after you get max shift out. Once you add weight to reduce RPMs to peak you will feel a noticeable difference in acceleration.

After the top of the clutch gets broken in it will feel like you have gone from a 4 speed trans to a 10 speed trans in your pickup. Much smoother and sled will drive away easier in heavy snow loads. Belt life will also increase.

Photo is a Polaris but same works for cat..

Love your explanation. It’s so simple and easy. I’m gonna use your explanation if you don’t mind. There is one cool step that will add 20% more in the top end though.
 

Mentzel

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Alternately if your belt is riding all the way to the top of primary you may need to gear up for more load.

Its easier to start with a ratio that is too high and work your way down using the sharpie lines.
Example
85mph@8250,
83mph,
81mph
79mph

The sled pictured above was factory geared at 85mph@8250. It would only pull 55 mph track speeds under full load and shift out ~60%. After gearing down to 75mph track speed we got full shift out on primary and roughy 60mph track speed under full load. Very good and felt smooth!
 

kanedog

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Top speed 55?
Probably 50+ mph track speed in a climb too.
Clutches 50° cooler than everyone else.

Sent it
Excellent ! I get about maybe 55-60mph top speed cuz it goes into over rev.
The crazy climbing ability is in the traction. Sometimes I think that other guys sleds are broken when I pass them in the deep, it’s that much of a difference.
 

Mentzel

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Excellent ! I get about maybe 55-60mph top speed cuz it goes into over rev.
The crazy climbing ability is in the traction. Sometimes I think that other guys sleds are broken when I pass them in the deep, it’s that much of a difference.
Draw sharpie lines and post pics of wear with peak RPM noted.
 

kanedog

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Draw sharpie lines and post pics of wear with peak RPM noted.
I am sharpie master! I will post after snow arrives which is usually Jan. I am such a sharpie ninja I even mark my buddies sleds too. They laugh at me when I open their side panel, sharpie in hand. I also learned that drawing four lines, 0, 90, 180, 270 will tell me if my clutch is out of alignment. I shocked myself looking at it. Motor mounts were shot.
 
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sno*jet

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ever hit a patch of ice or wind blown crust up on a gnarly climb? ability of the sled to react to lighter load and crank the track speed up in a hurry can be a life saver. might not see that in every black marker test but knock yourself out
 

kanedog

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ever hit a patch of ice or wind blown crust up on a gnarly climb? ability of the sled to react to lighter load and crank the track speed up in a hurry can be a life saver. might not see that in every black marker test but knock yourself out
What do you mean by that?
 

kanedog

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Draw three vertical lines on primary clutch sheave with sharpie. Ride for a day (make sure RPMs are hitting peak), then look at the lines for wear. If the lines are not completely worn off (belt riding to top of primary) gear down.

Keep gearing down in 2mph increments until you are using 100% of the clutches. This will take all factors including rider weight into account when setting gear ratio. You may need to add primary weight as your peak RPMs will start to increase. So add weight after you get max shift out. Once you add weight to reduce RPMs to peak you will feel a noticeable difference in acceleration.

After the top of the clutch gets broken in it will feel like you have gone from a 4 speed trans to a 10 speed trans in your pickup. Much smoother and sled will drive away easier in heavy snow loads. Belt life will also increase.

Photo is a Polaris but same works for cat..

On this sled it’s about a full point away from hitting one to one. If 2.3 it should be 3.3
 

Sage Crusher

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Agreed with the ratio conversions from Kanedog- My point and reason for gearing is not to go fast but to be more efficient. I have seen and have stock sleds that do pound the turbo in the deep-and I don't give a crapola on the trail. Bottom line is I was asking about ( or if anyone has on the Alpha) a slight gear up-
I can clutch for the gearing up to get rid of the aggressive bottom and have clutched for years to remove the excessive heat full shift to 1:1.. that is the easy part...( till the 3.5 pitch drivers came into play and lucky enough to have true 8 drivers again)
Snow condition that change weekly here @ 10,000' IS WHY THE GEARING CAME TO MIND...As Stated in my first post- I was reflecting back on the old (2014 and up M8 day's) when clutching was so low to over come clutch issues from factory CAT!
The Mighty Alpha- may not suffer from this - but the aluminum gear has to go and thinks the 3.5 ratio is all to be had to clutch around swinging the 165 ( from the post I have read so far)
Additionally with regards to the sharpie- yes that a good aged old trick that many of us have used for years- and glad it was brought back up- however- clutching now ( springs) come heavily into play once you have the gearing figured out- as heat will build , and if you cannot control the torque.. you get this ..full shift out but not all power to the track..
Ya its buffed out 1/2 one side. It's fixed- but just a step from a client in the wrong direction with spring.
 

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kanedog

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Agreed with the ratio conversions from Kanedog- My point and reason for gearing is not to go fast but to be more efficient. I have seen and have stock sleds that do pound the turbo in the deep-and I don't give a crapola on the trail. Bottom line is I was asking about ( or if anyone has on the Alpha) a slight gear up-
I can clutch for the gearing up to get rid of the aggressive bottom and have clutched for years to remove the excessive heat full shift to 1:1.. that is the easy part...( till the 3.5 pitch drivers came into play and lucky enough to have true 8 drivers again)
Snow condition that change weekly here @ 10,000' IS WHY THE GEARING CAME TO MIND...As Stated in my first post- I was reflecting back on the old (2014 and up M8 day's) when clutching was so low to over come clutch issues from factory CAT!
The Mighty Alpha- may not suffer from this - but the aluminum gear has to go and thinks the 3.5 ratio is all to be had to clutch around swinging the 165 ( from the post I have read so far)
Additionally with regards to the sharpie- yes that a good aged old trick that many of us have used for years- and glad it was brought back up- however- clutching now ( springs) come heavily into play once you have the gearing figured out- as heat will build , and if you cannot control the torque.. you get this ..full shift out but not all power to the track..
Ya its buffed out 1/2 one side. It's fixed- but just a step from a client in the wrong direction with spring.
Heehee soft spring or too much weight. I smell belt! The clutch is being held open against her will!
 

Reddragon800

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Alpha gearing is 19/50, pair that with the larger drivers and you have a very high 1-1 speed to achieve. From all my testing last year, the alpha (stock) will only achieve 43-44 mph track speed in a steep and deep climb. When you calculate the actual 1-1 on a stock alpha its 71.7 mph. You are literally only using 61% of your clutching efficiency. Gearing down is the only option.....
 

summ8rmk

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Alpha gearing is 19/50, pair that with the larger drivers and you have a very high 1-1 speed to achieve. From all my testing last year, the alpha (stock) will only achieve 43-44 mph track speed in a steep and deep climb. When you calculate the actual 1-1 on a stock alpha its 71.7 mph. You are literally only using 61% of your clutching efficiency. Gearing down is the only option.....
My issue with gearing down is, i like to hit that 70-75mph down the trail....
I do agree it would perform better in the trees and up the hill with lower gears.

Sent it
 

kanedog

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My issue with gearing down is, i like to hit that 70-75mph down the trail....
I do agree it would perform better in the trees and up the hill with lower gears.

Sent it
Get a trail sled and sign up on hardcoresledder. Problem solved.
 

summ8rmk

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Get a trail sled and sign up on hardcoresledder. Problem solved.
Haha, naw,
I am quite happy with the stock gearing on the Alpha.
Performs very well off trail and still books down the trail to get back to the truck.
It's the best all around performance stock sled i have ever ridden.
Could it be better, sure.... everything could be improved but....... the lord giveth and the lord taketh!
Gain here and lose there...... pick ur poison...
Happy sledding.
 
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