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Team secondary screws and helix install How-To

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IQRIDR

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So I wanted to make a quick, simple tutorial on how to properly remove your helix screws without damaging them or your clutch, as well as how to install delrin washers and a new secondary spring. I know, plenty of us know how already, this is for those who don't and would like to save some trouble and money performing their own simple upgrades.

Step 1- remove your secondary, making sure not to drop the washers from your jackshaft, they will usually stick to the back of your secondary output shaft from the grease on the jackshaft. No pictures needed.

Step 2- Buy a Snap on or similar high-quality (I have used them all, the snapon is the best IMO) T27 socket for a 3/8 drive.

Before attempting removal, spray some Aero-Kroil or similar penetrating oil in the gap around each screw.(deep creep, pb work but Aero is the best again IMO) Then use a propane or Map gas torch to heat each screw individually. You are looking to burn the yellow loc-tite on the screw for easy removal.



Step 3- Hammer the t27 bit down into the screw until the thud turns to a metallic clank as the bit bottoms in the screw face. Hold the clutch from the underside, and using a light duty impact gun, loosen the screw. If you have to hold the trigger more than a 1 second to get it to break loose, stop and re-heat the screw some more. If you do this correctly you will have a 100% success rate.


Next, use a dead blow or plastic hammer to rotate the helix slightly so you have a ledge to pry against. Then use 2 pry bars or screw drivers to release the helix- it just needs a little help. It's not under pressure, you don't need to worry about spring tension yet.


Step 4- Use a threaded clutch compressor to compress the roller spider down to prepare for releasing of the output shaft circlip. Some use the SLP lever-style tool, I prefer the threaded tool because it does not move the spider back and forth as you attempt to reinstall it onto the splined output shaft.


Release the circlip and loosen your clutch compressor, exposing the spring.


Step 5- install one delrin washer into the lower spring cup, and 1 into the underside of the roller spider. Boom, you just tightened up the RPM delivery of your Pro bigtime for $11. Install your secondary spring (hopefully a black/purple for a Pro)



Step 6- you are now ready to reinstall the roller spider. Do yourself a big favor and grab a marking pen, and looking at the output shaft splines, find the double-tooth spline and mark above it vertically. This will help you line up the spider onto the shaft: the X on the spider will align with your mark above the splines as you compress it downward.



Make sure you seat the circlip solid back into its groove. Install your helix with the desired angle facing the "x" on the backside of the sheave, but more importantly, make sure you drop the helix angle onto the rollers in the desired track. The backside of the secondary can be spun to where the X does not match the roller orientation in some instances, particularly with a Tied clutch.

Do not impact the screws back in. Tighten them until the helix is flat in the sheave and just torque them very lightly- like 10 ft lbs.

Hopefully this well help some people save their bits, screws and frustration. Feel free to add anything particularly pertinent.
 
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I

IQRIDR

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any way an admin can change the title of this to "Team secondary screws and helix install How-To" or something similar? I didn't mean to make this the title. Or delete it and I will change the title and re-post
 

winter brew

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W

Also, once the screws are out, flip the clutch over and tap it on the bench....the helix will fall out.

You are having better luck than I am with these things if you are getting 100%.
Whatever process they have used on these screws the last couple years is selling a lot of spare screws.... I broke 2 snap-on bits just today after heating and trying to finesse them out. It was quicker and cheaper to drill them out after that. Before last year I never had ANY issues with team screws since the clutch came out in 1998...weird. :face-icon-small-dis. I wonder what exactly has changed, I don't see anything obvious.
 
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IQRIDR

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Also, once the screws are out, flip the clutch over and tap it on the bench....the helix will fall out.

You are having better luck than I am with these things if you are getting 100%.
Whatever process they have used on these screws the last couple years is selling a lot of spare screws.... I broke 2 snap-on bits just today after heating and trying to finesse them out. It was quicker and cheaper to drill them out after that. Before last year I never had ANY issues with team screws since the clutch came out in 1998...weird. :face-icon-small-dis. I wonder what exactly has changed, I don't see anything obvious.

Any time I get ANY resistance I just pop the bit out and heat it another 30 seconds or so. Combined with the Aero Kroil I can't remember the last time I broke a screw. I just have the snap on guy replace the bit as it starts to twist the head.
 

LoudHandle

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I agree with Winter Brew; the helix falls out with a short drop to a block of wood, HDPE or similar, and no pry bar marks to file off, so the helix will sit flat again. Again just my two cents, whatever works for you.
 

joshkoltes

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I took mine apart about a month ago. Ended up useing an impact screwdriver but ruined two cheepo bits and the fussy screw.
I did notice aluminum filings so I separated the shives to find that the washer that the removal tool and the adjustment bolt constantly rides on has been eating into the inside shive face about 1/16 or better right under the adjuster
 

damx

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What's the differance in putting the washers on eather side or just the cup? Would washers not be better both sides ??
 
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IQRIDR

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Yes sorry I spaced that as this was a freebie for a buddy- most of the time I will put one under the cup, one inside the cup, and one in the spider.
 
I

IQRIDR

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I agree with Winter Brew; the helix falls out with a short drop to a block of wood, HDPE or similar, and no pry bar marks to file off, so the helix will sit flat again. Again just my two cents, whatever works for you.

There's never any pry bar marks to file off. There's little to no effort involved and if helixes were made of plastic I'd worry about it. Plenty of helixes dont just fall out when you flip them over but I'm never exerting myself prying them out either.

Don't worry about needing to file anything people. This is not rocket science.
 
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pura vida

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What I found worked well for me was to back out the deflection screw so there is no pressure on the spring and the helix comes out with little effort. Normally can do it with my fingers or at most a slight tap with a rubber mallet and then can pull it right out.

PV
 
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Oregonsledder

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I just removed the screws on a Team 12 PRO 800 secondary. 45 seconds of map gas directly on the screw and they come out very easy, even with the cheapo tool. The key is heat to melt the loctite. I didn't even need any kind of impact driver. I have done some in the past on older sleds that would make you cuss, but this one was way easy.
 

Kraven

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Yes sorry I spaced that as this was a freebie for a buddy- most of the time I will put one under the cup, one inside the cup, and one in the spider.

Good thread

NOT to argue, BUT SLP insists on only ONE (1) Delrin under the cup, & that's it!

It's in their catalog, plus when I spoke to them about it, they were adamant about (3) Delrins causing an issue
 
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IQRIDR

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Good thread

NOT to argue, BUT SLP insists on only ONE (1) Delrin under the cup, & that's it!

It's in their catalog, plus when I spoke to them about it, they were adamant about (3) Delrins causing an issue

Interesting. I don't know what kind of issue it could cause aside from another pound or two of spring force. Well, I've done a few hundred clutches like that and never seen a single issue, I'll keep doing it. Thanks for the info
 

LoudHandle

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Interesting. I don't know what kind of issue it could cause aside from another pound or two of spring force. Well, I've done a few hundred clutches like that and never seen a single issue, I'll keep doing it. Thanks for the info

The only one that comes to mind would be the possibility of coil bind on some springs, but that would be easy enough to check / calculate before hand. I would hope they are not running these cheap steel springs that close to the limit though.
 
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IQRIDR

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The only one that comes to mind would be the possibility of coil bind on some springs, but that would be easy enough to check / calculate before hand. I would hope they are not running these cheap steel springs that close to the limit though.

Agreed. And they're not. Take the SLP spring shim for example. A sled would exhibit some obvious symptoms if the spring was binding hard.
 
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