Product Review: Razorback Technologies infrared belt temp gauge

Scott

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I purchased the Razorback 3.0 Pro model edition in early December from Razorbackusa.com
Their main clientele is the UTV and side x side markets, but they are breaking into the sledding industry as well.

Wet heavy snow conditions, poor throttle usage or other types of heavy load can lead to high belt temps and a reduced belt life. I'm always checking out gadgets and ways to get more information and feedback...so this is product is right up my alley. And after the install and a few rides, I can tell you it gives GREAT feedback.

Their website is easy to navigate and the purchase was a snap. I happened to be in southern Idaho that week so I arranged to swing in and pick it up instead of having it shipped. They were really nice, cordial and very helpful with a few pointers and tips.

I'll post the install photos and some of the things I learned along the way.







Here are some nice photos from their website.










This is the sensor that faces toward the belt.
 

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Scott

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I'm mounting it on my 2013 Pro RMK.
I took some time to decide whether to mount it on the clutch cover by the oil reservoir or back where the little tool pouch is.


The instal instructions were quite simple and straight forward.

I settled on the tool pouch area. I don't like that tool pouch as it's hard to access.

Pics and explanations to follow.











 

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Scott

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One of the pitfalls they warned me of was to not let the temp sensor touch any metal due to shorting or grounding out. I found a nice spot in my dash to cut out disk of plastic to use as a mounting plate.
(I put an SLP flowrite vent in that spot, so it worked out well).


I took my time when mounting the plastic plate.
Measure thrice and cut once.













DONE DEAL!!!
 

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Scott

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Final pics of mounting the sensor.

I was trying to be careful not to kink the sensor cable. Having it between the tank shroud and clutch cover should be a pretty safe place to be under normal usage. It would take something pretty rough to collapse or cave in on that.








Underside of the clutch cover, looking up at the sensor.



Final mount and wire route!!!

 

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Scott

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I struggled with a mounting location for the gauge.
I didn't want to have to disconnect any more wires when the hood goes on and off (which isn't really that often) and I didn't want the gauge to be exposed to tree branches or problems if I rolled the sled over.

Sooo, I put it down by the steering post out of the way. I have to look down to read it, but I don't have to look at it as often as I would water temp, afr or other gauges I would use.


So it goes here. I can always move it if I don't like it.
















 

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Scott

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The temps on groomed roads and trails are the best...usually 115-130.

Off trail in dry powder I have been seeing 120-140.

On Saturday we had WET HEAVY powder and I was seeing 140-145.

When I let off the throttle and stop the sled for a minute, the temp sensor warms up, but as soon as get rolling again, it drops right back down.

It's a fairly responsive sensor. NOT so responsive that you can't read the numbers like EGT probes, but just enough to give you a nice accurate reading on the spot. It's just about right for what a belt temp sensor should be.


 

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Scott

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This is video from cruising down a groomed trail with just a couple inches of fresh on it.
No heavy throttle. Mostly flat ground.
I'd call this the minimum running temps in ideal conditions for the coolest belt temp.

Does anyone know how to embed a video from Google Drive?
Can you view this OK?
VIDEO
 

Timbre

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That's quite innovative!! What a great way to keep an eye on belt temps.

Thanks for sharing this and taking the time to do a through write up during installing!
 

summ8rmk

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On days like this, my belt was 200° on flat ground. And 226° with any climbing.
I stopped a lot to let the belt cool.


Where i mounted my gauge. I do have to disconnect the cable when i remove the hood.


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Scott

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The highest I've seen on days like that is 155ish.
 

Scott

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I've only seen my orange light come on one time. That was last Saturday is VERY WET HEAVY powder. It hit in the 170s on a climb.
 

summ8rmk

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She's bright red at 220!
My sled cruising up the groomed trail is 150+.
If i want to run 65mph+ im in the 170°'s

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Scott

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Interesting.
How close is your sensor mounted to the clutch? Is it sensing the primary or the secondary?
 

d8grandpa

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Is there a maximum temp that a belt should not get above? I have never seen that posted anywhere by a belt manufacturer.
 

Scott

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I'd avoid the 190s.

But if you are seeing 200s, you are over-stressing the belt.
 
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