Arctic Cat is far less represented than Skidoo and Polaris, discussion

BeartoothBaron

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I have to bring this up.
Does anyone remember the mid 90's? Polaris had been using the same basic wedge chassis for over 13 years with "refinements". They sold the trailing arm IFS as a superior design to the double A-arm suspension. Polaris is now able to bring new features and ideas to life much faster but there was a time when they were lacking. Now Cat is lacking but who knows, maybe 2033 they could be back on top.
Both Doo and Yammi also used trailing arms into the early 2000s. Clearly, given that everything uses A-arms these days, trailing arms were a net disadvantage, but not enough that advancements in engines, tracks, skids and such couldn't make for a better overall sled for a while. I don't think many riders would pick a 90s Cat over a Polaris EDGE; it's not like trailing arms were a major liability. There were some advantages too, and it's no wonder they were hyped – even while A-arm chassis were being developed. That's just marketing.

The next big winner in the chassis department could be Cat. It will be whoever can do some forward thinking on the riding experience and come up with something compelling for everybody, not just experienced riders. Especially critical for a company like Cat, it would have to appear during a cycle where snow conditions and the economy help drive sales, and it'd have to be developed and tested well enough to be reasonably reliable out of the gate. Doo, and likely Poo, could afford to release an all-new sled during a bad year and realize the profits down the road. It would be a much bigger gamble for Cat: introduce it for a weak season or release a product with too many issues, and the other guys will be able to respond before Cat can realize and build on their success. As someone who tends to root for the little guy though, I would love to see Cat make a gamble that pays off, and would buy one if it fit the budget. Even for Doo or Poo loyalists, a resurgent Cat would mean better products down the road; competition is good.
 

volcano buster

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I'm still concerned about a snowcheck only option to buy. There are very few things I am willing to just drop some coin and wait for if I don't know what I am getting first.
 

mountaincat 800

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Both Doo and Yammi also used trailing arms into the early 2000s. Clearly, given that everything uses A-arms these days, trailing arms were a net disadvantage, but not enough that advancements in engines, tracks, skids and such couldn't make for a better overall sled for a while. I don't think many riders would pick a 90s Cat over a Polaris EDGE; it's not like trailing arms were a major liability. There were some advantages too, and it's no wonder they were hyped – even while A-arm chassis were being developed. That's just marketing.
The Edge came in 2002.
Anyway, my point had nothing to do with the trailing arms really. Point was Polaris used the same chassis for umting years.
Oh and the 1M Mountain Cat handled better then the Edge and had way more torque and weight.
 

Clark42

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I'm still concerned about a snowcheck only option to buy. There are very few things I am willing to just drop some coin and wait for if I don't know what I am getting first.

I'd be curious to see if that trend catches on. It would probably help out dealerships, as they wouldn't have holdover sleds sitting on the floor that eventually are discounted to a point where they lose money to make a sale. Check out that article I dropped here, Ford is moving away from the traditional 'stock inventory' approach to made-to-order only.

 

Clark42

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Well, despite being the creator of this thread, and being critical and sometimes overly critical. I still love these cats! Brought home this winter’s ride yesterday. Let it snow!
B6535477-F79D-499E-ABE2-6B6058EC8007.jpeg
 

hansenmac

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there are many things the company does(or doesn't do) that frustrates everyone, but they do build a good sled and a good looking one too.
 

Escmanaze

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I'd be curious to see if that trend catches on. It would probably help out dealerships, as they wouldn't have holdover sleds sitting on the floor that eventually are discounted to a point where they lose money to make a sale. Check out that article I dropped here, Ford is moving away from the traditional 'stock inventory' approach to made-to-order only.

I sure hope it doesn't catch on. Half the reason I can actually afford to buy a new sled is because I'm willing to wait for holdovers. If I had to fork out $15k for a snowcheck - yikes - I'm not sure just exactly what I would do. Hopefully I don't have to find out any time soon.
 

Vern

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I heard it on Facebook so take it for what it’s worth, but people were saying Polaris will be snowcheck only for at least this year with all the supply issues.
 

Vern

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I think so too. It could also have the potential to bring the cost down when they are not producing more sleds than they will actually sell.
 

Clark42

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It makes sense for Ford in this bizarre time and place. If they have 1,000,000 built/no-computer units and only 500,000 microchips. May as well go to a build-to-order format and allocate those chips in units that will turn quickly.

We'll see if it catches on elsewhere. I work in the car industry, the margin between invoice and MSRP is alot thinner than people think. On a 50,000 dollar car it may be 2-3000. On a 30,000 car it's usually around 1500-1000 bucks. When model year inventory lapses and those 'dealer discounts' start hitting, it wipes out the whole margin. Great for consumers, really tough on dealerships. Car dealers can recoup with back end product (warranty, gap, other bs). I don't know if powersports dealers operate similarly.

If I was a dealership, I'd love a snowcheck-only model; pretty much guaranteed to be selling at MSRP and less risk of having 2-year-old inventory rotting on the floor. Something I feel like Arctic Cat really was notorious for (in the late 00's early 10's) - over shipping of in-season units. Once again, still my open and debatable opinion!
 
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sno*jet

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nice sled clark. what boards are you putting on? i did get annyoed with mine this last spring finally, riding with snowbikes.
 

ullose272

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If you look at Polaris UTVs right now they are order only with a rare floor model that comes in that sells fast. Wouldnt be suprised if sleds go the same way for a bit

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NHRoadking

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Is there really a downside to order only?

Probably would keep used sled prices higher.
 

hansenmac

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it is nice to be able to go to a dealership and see something in the showroom, so maybe the dealers can order some if they want to but not be forced to take more than they can sell.
 

Clark42

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nice sled clark. what boards are you putting on? i did get annyoed with mine this last spring finally, riding with snowbikes.

Probably bdx. I had them on last year's sled and liked them. I like bmfab too but the traction screws shredded my pants
 
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