Yamaha 2020 Sled Release

christopher

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Yamaha giveth and Yamaha taketh away for model year 2020.



When Yamaha unveiled its 2020 lineup, we found out the two-stroke is the new MP600 Transporter, a utility sled with a 153x15x2.25-inch PowerClaw track. So the Transporter, which uses the 6000 C-Tec2 SDI engine built by Arctic Cat, is technically a long track sled. That is where Yamaha giveth.


A mild surprise when looking over the 2020 Yamaha lineup is the complete absence of a mountain snowmobile. The lone mountain sled—the Sidewinder M-TX LE 162—in the 2019 model lineup is gone and isn’t being replaced with any other mountain model.


Yamaha taketh away.
“Yamaha remains committed to clearing out non-current models to ensure a higher equity for existing customers and profitability for dealers,” a Yamaha official told us. “We have adequate inventory in the market to satisfy customer demand, and for 2020 this includes our M-TX models. Our current model lineup must match our business strategy.”


We told you last year that Yamaha was cutting back its snowmobile lineup to reflect the then current state of the snowmobile industry. The company drastically cut back its snowmobile lineup for model year 2019 to 13 models. That number has increased to 16 models for next season, thanks mostly to new trail models and the MP600 Transporter.
It would be misleading to say the MP600 Transporter is the only “long track” in the MY2020 lineup for Yamaha. Yamaha returns to 2020 with the Sidewinder B-TX LE, which also has the 153x15x2.25-inch PowercClaw track. This crossover sled will appeal to those who want a four-stroke for on- and off-trail riding.

And, from the sounds of it, there are still a few Sidewinder M-TX LE sleds in the pipeline.


Perhaps one interesting sidenote on the MP600 Transporter is that it comes with Yamaha mountain skis, a mountain seat and a 38-inch ski stance.


We’re trying really hard not to read anything into the Transporter … but is it really far fetched to think that this could morph into a mountain sled in the future?


Moving on, along with a bevy of trail sleds, Yamaha returns next season with two different models of its popular Snoscoot ES. New carbs (improved starting), wider handlebars, new engine mounts, tighter steering radius (20 percent tighter), updated clutching, new airbox, new flip choke lever and painted bumpers are many of the new features for next season.


Yamaha announced it was putting tethers on all its 2020 models as well.
 

Escmanaze

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Really sad day

Well, we all saw it coming right? What was it, 2006 or so when they officially decided they would only do 4-stroke sleds? Everybody said "I sure hope they change their minds...if not, they are done for in the west." Well, here we are. We were correct. That stubborn move has now officially run its course and here we stand in 2020 with officially only 3 manufacturers of mountain snowmobiles. Devastating sad day for those of us who used to love the phazers and the mountain maxes.

"pour out a little liquor for my dead homie emoji"
 

Turblue

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I believe they have a plan and that includes making sure the current Sidewinder mtx will hold its value...coming out with something completely different would disregard the statement they made for last season(balance the market). As much as today’s society relies on constant change to have the lastest and greatest, Yamaha has recognized and followed through with a promise to maintain balance. I give them kudos and firmly believe they are here to stay....including the mountain segment. I assume there will be plenty 17,18, and 19s mtx’s to satisfy for this year

Honestly no manufacturer has come out with anything drastically different...they are also pulling the reins back in my mind.
 

turboless terry

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Everyone has come out with new stuff except Yamaha. They just yanked the reins out of the horses mouth. After you run something into the dirt it doesn't just come back in one day or even one year. Yamaha has never really made anything stellar from a mountain standpoint. I turboed a nytro. Power was awesome but the chassis was a pile. Then they used the cat chassis which was way better but everyone was over the weight and going a different direction by then. Going back to the mountain max, well, They sounded cool and that was about it. Only seen one that ran good and that was my dealers wife's sled. Had a pile of money in it. Still wouldn't beat my rev. They were heavy. People aren't getting any younger. They aren't going to wait. Even if they came out with a new mountain max triple 2 stroke, which they won't, why would you want it. It would be heavy and make the sled wider which is a no go for me and a lot of others. No need to keep making excuses for them.
Now if we are talking generators, I'll take one of them anyday over a honda.
 

goridedoo

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Im sure we will see a mountain sled from them in 2021. A little discouraging to not see a 2020, BUT I bet if you want new Yamaha mountain sled your dealer will be able to get you one (2018 or 2019) and considerably cheap than an identical 2020 would be (would have been).

Certainly an idication that they may be struggling with mountain sled sales, but I don’t think they thrown the towel in yet.

Theres always “next year” LOL
 
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You can have any sled so long as its a sidewinder..... that just goes to show how few of those they are selling that they have to wait at least 2 years to let the dealers clear out 16,17 and 18 sleds.... thats bad.... i think for yamaha its just a sad day for all of sledding killing a whole segment is no small thing... i think back when yamaha started the whole 4 stroke craze with dirt bikes they would do the same with sleds (to this day i think if the ama didnt give the 4 strokes such a huge displacement advantage they never would have taken over)... and yamaha was rideing high thinking to do the same with sleds early on it sortof worked and lots of peope got them, good inital reviews, lots of people thinking it was the new big thing... and slowly people relised they just were not doing what they needed them to do, (insert your reason here) time went on and still getting good reviews online and on tv (testers paid/ afraid to say what was really the elephant in the room that this 4 stroke thing wasent really working, now we are here the allmighty $ will always show what companys are thinking... i really like yamaha, i want so bad for them to pull up the panties suck it up and design a real sled like we all know they can (a 2 stroke with a wicked chassies all made by yamaha) but like most people that are tired of saying maby next year i think after this i am done with that idea too
 
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I'd like to know where this unrealistic expectation is coming from. Everyone (myself included) thinks that Yamaha has the potential to come out with this godly machine that will take the market by storm. but why??

Yes they did once have sole ownership of the top manufacturer in the snowmobile market, and they do make some very reliable 2 strokes. However, with the way the market has gone; Light and nimble with exceptional suspension.. I doubt they could ever compete without Arctic Cat's help.

This just isn't Yamaha's way of thinking.. Maybe in the 80s when everything was sub-400 lbs they were 'light' but that was it.. They have always over built their chassis, and I'm not sure if they have ever successfully designed a suspension that could compete with their competitors at that specific period of time.

My father was a Yamaha loyalist, and he started me out to be one.. I just can't stand behind a four-stroke exclusive manufacturer.. It just doesn't make sense in my mind. The trail guys love them, and some diehard Yamaha guys say they work off trail. I'm just not a believer that Yamaha wants to be any more than they are right now.. a 4th tier snowmobile manufacturer.
 

Wrenchmaster

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You can have any sled so long as its a sidewinder..... that just goes to show how few of those they are selling that they have to wait at least 2 years to let the dealers clear out 16,17 and 18 sleds.... thats bad.... i think for yamaha its just a sad day for all of sledding killing a whole segment is no small thing... i think back when yamaha started the whole 4 stroke craze with dirt bikes they would do the same with sleds (to this day i think if the ama didnt give the 4 strokes such a huge displacement advantage they never would have taken over)... and yamaha was rideing high thinking to do the same with sleds early on it sortof worked and lots of peope got them, good inital reviews, lots of people thinking it was the new big thing... and slowly people relised they just were not doing what they needed them to do, (insert your reason here) time went on and still getting good reviews online and on tv (testers paid/ afraid to say what was really the elephant in the room that this 4 stroke thing wasent really working, now we are here the allmighty $ will always show what companys are thinking... i really like yamaha, i want so bad for them to pull up the panties suck it up and design a real sled like we all know they can (a 2 stroke with a wicked chassies all made by yamaha) but like most people that are tired of saying maby next year i think after this i am done with that idea too

I agree, not a good move committing to thumpers, they are cool in their own way, but have had their day. What I can't understand is that Yamaha has the 2 stroke tech with watercraft and outboard engines to build a sled engine. They still offer a 2 stroke dirtbike, but like always, way behind the curve with it. No 6 speed trans or lights like all the other woods bikes or 300cc displacement. Is it just arrogance? too proud to admit the 4 stroke decision was a bad one?
I'd also love to see what they could come up with on their own, a big bore 2 stroke twin in a Yami mountain chassis would be really cool. I don't understand why they don't listen to the consumer
 

Uncle Bob

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Arctic cat is on the same path here. Cleaning out the pipeline because they have a joint effort project coming out that will render all non current machines valueless. I honestly believe this. Cat has a snow check only program this year. If you buy in season it will have to be non current pretty much. I think we just Waite one more year
 

Mafesto

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Do Cat and/or Yamaha have snowmobile specific production facilities?
Or are the assembly lines multi-capable? If so what other products are produced in these facilities?
 

d1100t

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Factory

Cat builds sleds, quads and side by sides in the same factory. At least they used to.
I'm not sure what Yamaha does??
 

BeartoothBaron

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I don't have any experience with Yamaha to speak of, so I have no specific insight, but nothing against them either. That said, looking at the market as a whole, it's not the time I'd expect any manufacturer to mount a major effort. It's just not a market with a lot of growth potential, or lots of open gaps to exploit. The competition in the mountain segment is pretty fierce, and obviously they've been lagging there for a long time. There are plenty of options in the trail and utility segments too, including a number of 4-stroke offerings from Doo. Essentially, it would take a major effort to leap-frog the other manufacturers, the kind that would cost more than they're likely to recoup unless there was a resurgence. The only way I see Yamaha mounting a big return is if they have some revolutionary idea they're willing to bank on.

In the long run, I'd guess they at least stay in the game as an engine manufacturer. Could be like Polaris and Fuji in the 80s, obviously with Cat in this case. They could keep re-labeling Cat sleds, but that seems like a losing game. Maybe they keep going with a limited line of their own sleds, but that's more like a pet project, which isn't something major corporations like to do. I can't imagine they've been making money on snowmobiles of late, and while I would welcome the competition they could ideally offer, I don't see it coming.
 

jim

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From what I'm seeing, Arctic Cat (Textron) and Yamaha are focused on inventory reduction (build, spares and floor inventory) for the next year.
 
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