URGENT: Avalanche Reporting

deschutes

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Jan 23, 2008
729
264
63
Hi

I just want to let you all know that it is absolutely critical that all witnessed avalanches, regardless of size, are reported. Oregon has very few resources for avalanche forecasting and such, outside of Mt. Hood. We have to collect data in order to make the case that Oregon needs these resources as well. Unfortunately, this has been a little difficult in the past, and there has been little to no coordination.

I have been working with a group that is spearheading the efforts to get these resources, the Central Oregon Avalanche Association (COAA). We have created a simple online reporting system that anyone can use to submit data. It is very basic right now, as we wanted to get it out there. It will mature and evolve over time. Even if you do not have all the information that is requested PLEASE send in what you have.

You can access the Oregon EARS (Electronic Avalanche Reporting System) at: http://ears.sledspace.com

At this point it would be good if people would report avalanches that they have heard about as well, not just witnessed personally. Just be sure to make that clear in the write-up. If you do witness a slide, please try and document it as completely as possible, photos and a thorough description of the snow and conditions are great to have.

By making reports you very well could be saving lives down the road.

Please let me know if you have any questions.
 
Last edited:
Dec 3, 2007
69
5
8
.
Ochoco and Deschutes National Forests
and Prineville District Bureau of Land Management
Office of Communications
Working as One to Serve Central Oregon
www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon
For immediate release: January 5, 2010
Contact: Sue Olson (541) 383-5561
Back Country Avalanche Conditions Increase
in Warming Weather
Deschutes National Forest—With current warming weather conditions, avalanche danger
increases in the back country. “The snowpack is now being loaded with wet snow and
rain,” says Deschutes National Forest Trail Coordinator Chris Sabo. “There is a layer of
instability below the surface of the snowpack, and with more wet snow and rain loading
on top, avalanche danger is increased.”
Avalanche potential increases with rapid snowfall, rain and changing temperatures, and
the avalanche hazard can escalate in a short time. Back country recreationists venturing
into avalanche terrain should be knowledgeable in recognizing potential avalanche
conditions and act accordingly. Back country travelers are strongly urged to perform
snow pack assessment and stability tests and to make safe route selections.
For more information on avalanche ecology and safety practices, visit the Forest Service
National Avalanche Center Avalanche Awareness website at
http://www.fsavalanche.org/.
 
Feb 4, 2009
64
6
8
63
WA
SPOUTSPRINGS AV

ON 2-27-2010 MY SON WAS SNOWMOBLING THE MOUNTAIN BEHIND THE SPOUTSPRINGS SKI RESORT WAS INVOVLED IN A AVALANDE SIZE WAS 130 FT -90FT SMALL BUT WAS VERY SURPRISED. HAVE PICTURES IF NEEDED:shocked:
 
Feb 4, 2009
64
6
8
63
WA
BRICE when my son gets back from spout sunday I will have him post the pictures. It took him about 45 min to dig his sled out Ive seen the pictures and was very surprised . his riding partner went up the hill the corniss was to tall so he turned back down my son went up to highmark as he went up he could see it start to crack about 1ft crack or so. I will have him be more through than Im headed back down that is when it caught him.
 
Premium Features