TRITON TC167 HYBRID TRAILER BUILD

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
So after lots of talk the past couple years I made the jump last week and picked up a holdover 2019 Triton TC167 Trailer. Been talking about having a lighter smaller trailer to travel around the Midwest and West with for a couple years and this is the route I deceived to go with. Trailer has the optional Fuel door but otherwise I believe is the standard build model. Over the next few weeks I’ll update with all the build items and report back over the season on how it works out. As of now I have around 10,000 miles of planned trips set-up that this trailer will see. Should be a good test. The attached picture is from last Saturday when I picked it up.


88B580D8-E1CA-43A0-8101-D830A45EAC4B.jpeg
 

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
if you don't mind how much was this bad boy? Also your glides I have found the leading edge on the door will need attention...
You mean the leading edge of the door that has a composite treadplate on it? I have only been over it 3 times in and out with the sled so far but no marks at all on it yet. But I'll keep an eye on it.

Trailer was $6,095 plus tax. It was a 2019 holdover. The 2020 version is listed at $6,700 at all the dealers around plus another $100 I think for the fuel door option. Triton trailers are worth gold around here....
 

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
Get some Edge Glide 2.0's on that leading edge!

Trailer looks great!

I don't think you guys understand what the leading edge on these trailers is. I'll get some pictures when it stops raining here in MN to show it better. But it's a tapered composite treadplate edge that so far shows not even a mark from the carbides hitting it. So the edge glides would be redundant IMO as you already have a tapered durable surface.
 

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
Sorry I forgot about getting the picture up. Here is a picture of that composite edge of the rear ramp door. It’s a thick tread plate style of composite material. So far no marks on it through a few sled leadings. After hunting season I’ll get back into this with a few other items I want to get built for this season.
 

Attachments

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
I wish they still made the longer version that had two axles I think it was 22ft. The one you have is great, but I can not fit 3 polaris assaults in it.
That was an interesting model but I thought it actually pulled harder then the standard 7' wide x 29' long enclosed we had. But for me I'm only hauling one or two sleds anymore with a few friends that have stepped out of the sport the last couple years.
 

Chadx

Off the trail again...just can't wait to get off t
Lifetime Membership
Feb 2, 2010
592
348
63
48
Bozeman, MT
We've had the discontinued double axle version of the this trailer (TC167-2) for a few years now and have loved every minute of it. Ended up ordering it with the the black quad flooring (plywood with the bonded plastic veneer on both sides), white Lauan interior walls, extra channels along the walls, interior light switch and LED lights, thicker skin option, extra tall diamond plate option on the bull nose exterior, electric brakes on one axle, access door on left side and fuel door on the right, aluminum wheels and radial tires (vs stock bias ply), two side vents (left side low and to the rear and right side high and to the front), high spare tire carrier, etc.

Entire trailer only weighs 1,300 lbs. Can easily pull it behind my wife's car if need be, but typically use 1/2 ton pickup. Will fit two 175" mountain sleds, though nowadays we typically carry one 154" mountain sled and one snowbike. In the summer, it will fit two ATV end to end. Or, since I mount two wheel chocks at the front of the trailer utilizing the channels in the floor, two dirtbikes and one ATV behind those. I didn't hesitate to get a trailer with the lower roofline. I think it's about 5.5' inside and I'm 6'. We still change inside summer and winter. We use a folding milkstool type chairs. The lower ceiling for the 10 minutes while changing and loading/unloading is a small price to pay for the hours of towing each way with the lower roofline. It pulls like it's not even back there and is not as effected by headwinds as a 6' or 6' 6" roof. Would replace it with the same thing if I ever needed to (though might have to be a single axle because the tandem axles are few and far between. No one is selling them used so they must like them). I like the way the tandem rides over potholes and bumping forest service roads in the summertime. Smoother than single axle because one axle seems to support the trailer while the other goes through the hole rather than that entire side bumping through the pothole like a single axle.
 

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
A picture for reference on the interior size of one of these trailers. Sled on the left is a 2013 RMK Assault 155 and sled on the right is a 2017 RMK 174. The sled on the right still has another foot or better that it could be moved forward. You could easily load two 174's in one of these.

IMG_6595.jpg

Just getting back into playing with this trailer after a busy fall. Still have to build my front storage box and a couple other small items and it will be ready for this season.
 

32longtrack

Well-known member
Premium Member
Jan 2, 2008
112
61
28
Idaho
How has the new trailer been working so far? I'm very interested in getting a trailer like this either a TC167 or Proline IS716. I have a big hallmark trailer that fits 5 longtracks but find I could us a smaller, lightweight enclosed trailer, more than half the time I'm only pulling 2 sleds. I'll still keep my Hallmark but its a lot if it's just me going sled'n. I live in Idaho, no Triton dealers in my area, Proline is Factory direct, both look great. Can you move the trailer around by hand with your two sleds loaded in it?
 

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
How has the new trailer been working so far? I'm very interested in getting a trailer like this either a TC167 or Proline IS716. I have a big hallmark trailer that fits 5 longtracks but find I could us a smaller, lightweight enclosed trailer, more than half the time I'm only pulling 2 sleds. I'll still keep my Hallmark but its a lot if it's just me going sled'n. I live in Idaho, no Triton dealers in my area, Proline is Factory direct, both look great. Can you move the trailer around by hand with your two sleds loaded in it?
So far I've been happy with the trailer. It's worked just as I had hoped at this point. I leave Friday for BC with it which is about a 3,300 mile rounds trip for me and then a week after I get back I head for CO for the Forum ride which is another 2,200 miles. So by mid February I should have some better opinions after riding it out of for a few days and taking it into Grizzly Lodge. I will also have my 174 and another AXYS 163 in it for a few days so I'll get some better pictures of how those two sleds fit into it. But for now here are some thoughts about it.

The good:
- Pulls super easy behind a 1/2 ton. I picked up a 2017 F-150 in place of my 2500 Ram I had in early Jan and that makes this a much nicer set-up.
- It pulls smooth going down the road even for being the single axle version. And even in some 30-40 MPH winds I got into.
- Loading sleds in and out is super easy. The Caliper Glides help a bunch but it's a smooth process.

The bad:
- When you have two long sleds in it it's kind of a pain to walk between them. It's a little worse then our older 7' wide enclosed because of how the sleds have to sit. I figured this would be the case but wanted to mention it.
- With the two long sleds in the 2nd one's skis sit in front of the door a bit so you have to step over the skis when getting in or out of the trailer.
- The interior lights are wired into the marker lights for the trailer so you have to have the marker's on to have lights inside. I'll rewire this at some point to just be off the power of the truck.
- Putting the clamp on the front sled is a pain as you have to kneel down into the front V to get it on. I have a set of superclamps for the trailer I have not put in yet that should help.

I have not tried to move the trailer with the sleds in it. I would guess with how far back the axle sits there is a lot of tounge weight on the front of the trailer so that might be tough. It does move easy by hand when unloaded.

I have not seen the Proline trailer in person but it does look nice. I would assume they all tow as nice as the others. Mission also makes one now that's about the same size that a buddy has and he is happy with it so far. The front door on it makes access to the front sled easier.

IMG_6172.JPG

This was taken on the first trip north sledding behind the new truck. Really is an easy set-up to run with compared to some of the bigger stuff over the years.

IMG_6638.jpg
 

32longtrack

Well-known member
Premium Member
Jan 2, 2008
112
61
28
Idaho
Thank you for this great info! I'll look into mission trailers too, not many companies are making this type of trailer, what info I can find people are hauling short tracks in these trailers, never even seen one in my area. Please keep me posted how the trailer works on your trips, have a great time.
 

Chadx

Off the trail again...just can't wait to get off t
Lifetime Membership
Feb 2, 2010
592
348
63
48
Bozeman, MT
As mentioned earlier in this thread, I've had the (not discontinued) double axle version of the this trailer (TC167-2) for a few years now and have loved every minute of it. See details in my previous post further up this thread, but I'll second about every observation made above by "northMNsledder".

We've used superclamps from the start and though pricey, in my opinion, they pay for themselves in the first year and after that, the shear bliss of clicking them in place is free bliss. Ha.

My tandem axle weighs 1,300 lbs so single axle probably 1,150 (I didn't look up specs on Triton website). So add in 1,000 lbs of cargo and you are at 2,150 lbs. When loaded correctly (tongue weight 10% of total weight) you'll have 210 on the tongue. Not easily lifted and carried around by hand by the average person. On concrete, you'll be able to roll it around fairly well. But if you have to lift and maneuver on non-concrete surface, a trailer dolly makes it more manageable than lifting by hand. It really will depend on the ground surface on how easy it is to move around. Trailer dollys are the dolly with the ball on them. You put them in the tongue hitch and leverage them up so the wheels of the dolly take the weight and you "steer" it around as you pull on the dolly handle. Examples: https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_trailers-towing+trailer-dollies

I haven't rewired my interior lights yet. Like mentioned, they are on the same circuit as the trailer marker lights. This requires you to turn on your trucks headlights or parking lights to use the trailer interior lights. The nice thing about that is the truck doesn't have to be running. You can key it on without starting and turn on truck's parking lights and you'll have trailer interior lights power. Or, depending on how long you have your headlights set to stay on after you turn the engine off, the light circuit will stay on for that amount of time.

I have electric brakes on one axle so the trailer comes with an emergency battery that gets charged off the trucks 12v when hooked up. I'd planned to add a second small battery to that circuit and then wire the lights off that so I can use the interior lights even when it's not hooked up to the truck, but the battery would get some recharge when hooked up to the truck and driving. In reality, I typically just grab the headlamp from the truck and wear that when fueling, etc. even when I have the interior lights available. A headlamp shoots light exactly where I need it (down the machines fuel tank to see fuel level for example). While changing clothes at the trailhead, most days the light coming through the roof vent is plenty, but on dark days, we hang a battery powered lantern on some clothing hooks I mounted. Plenty of light and you can move it around to wear you need the light and recharge it anytime. All of those lighting options work so well it's made the rewiring less of a priority. I even bought a row of the 12v LED strip lights a few years ago and was going to use those for interior lights when I added a battery, but haven't bothered.

This fall, I also installed a cheap, self-contained version of a "diesel parking heater" and that has been an amazing addition. So now I even have a large deep cycle battery sitting there I could use for lights, but since I'll be taking the battery and heater out come summer then reinstalling ever winter, I instead hook up a battery tender on the battery after a trip rather than re-wiring it into the trailer wiring. The heater and battery will be removed in the summer time because I want the trailer space plus the battery is one of my boats deep cycle batterys. I could get a smaller, dedicated battery and wire it into the trailer and leave it there permanently (for lights and for winter-time heater), but just not worth the effort at this time.

By the way, I ordered mine from Summit Motorsports in Bozeman, MT. My previous trailer was a Triton flatbed and I was so impressed with that, I stuck with the Triton again. I looked at other brands. Not sure if I gave them a fair shake or not, but ended up with a Triton again. I think the Mission one was nice (and are made out here so factory is close should one need major warranty work) but there was some reason I went with Triton over the similar Mission. Was a few years ago, but I think the Mission version was 7.5' wide rather than 7', but I could be remembering wrong. But if so, some would think that little bit of extra width is a benefit, but I wanted to stay narrow to make it easier to see when backing up and towing. Hope that helps.
 

NorthMNSledder

Trail Coordinator
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
8,923
5,087
113
39
Ham Lake / Lake of the Woods, MN
This fall, I also installed a cheap, self-contained version of a "diesel parking heater" and that has been an amazing addition. So now I even have a large deep cycle battery sitting there I could use for lights, but since I'll be taking the battery and heater out come summer then reinstalling ever winter, I instead hook up a battery tender on the battery after a trip rather than re-wiring it into the trailer wiring. The heater and battery will be removed in the summer time because I want the trailer space plus the battery is one of my boats deep cycle batterys. I could get a smaller, dedicated battery and wire it into the trailer and leave it there permanently (for lights and for winter-time heater), but just not worth the effort at this time.
Chad, Can you talk a bit more about your heater? I was really thinking for next winter about giving the interior a quick spray foam/finish (something still lightweight) and putting heat in it and I'm kind of curious about your set-up?

I figured at this point I would run the season and see what else needs some tweaking and then build it out over next summer. So far it's getting new LED interior lights, a shore power system and some kind of custom storage box deal in the driver side front that never has anything parked there because of how the sleds sit staggered.
 

Chadx

Off the trail again...just can't wait to get off t
Lifetime Membership
Feb 2, 2010
592
348
63
48
Bozeman, MT
I use the front left corner for storage and now, the heater. But it's seasonal and all removable because in the summer, I have two motorcycle chocks in the front. This gives me many options. I can carry one or two dirtbikes in the front and an ATV in the back. Or two ATVs in a row. Chocks work for MTB as well. The in-floor channels and low wall channels (wall channels are an option) are great for mounting superclamp mounts, chocks, tie down rings, etc. and move them as needed seasonally.

For sled superclamps, I have two hooks spaced a few inches apart. That way, when a sled is loaded, odds are that one of the two can be used without playing the "3 inches further" or "three inches back" game. Ha. I use the channel tie downs for running large ratchet tie down straps over the ATV tires. I've found strapping down and ATV by the tires/wheels works much better than by the tow hitch, frame or racks which require compressing the suspension. True that on the 7x16 trailer the floor channels are spaced narrower which only allows one side of the wheels to line up with the channel and be tied down, but if you align it carefully, you can have another on the opposite side or use alternative tie down points on that side (I have an L-track on the other side that was needed for snowbike tie down so I hook to that). I also have two 4' section of L track in the front passenger side of the trailer because for snowbikes, I use the https://www.bikebinderz.com/ tie down system. Similar to superclamps for sleds, a bit pricey, but just a pleasure to use compared to ties downs to bars/triple clamp, don't put pressure on ski tip nosing it into anything, and very secure.

For heater, I used a cheapo chinese version of the diesel parking heater. It runs off a 12v battery for the glow plug and fan and a little diesel tank. Typically, they are in diesel trucks and use a pickup directly in the trucks/campers fuel tank, but if you have a gas vehicle or are using in trailer, shop, etc. you just use a little fuel tank. Exhaust must be vented outside through the exhaust pipe. Combustion intake is typically also routed to fresh air but trailers have enough venting that my intake is inside. There are expensive name brand versions of this type of heater as well, but I've been running this one without issues so far this season. And in this application, it's not critical if it breaks like it would be if one was using it in a camper/van with sleeping area.

I bought the all inclusive (which just means all the components are mounted in a little cabinet about the size of a computer tower) for about $180. They draw about 10amps of 12v for while the glow plugs are on (for the first 5 minutes and last 5 minutes the heater is on), otherwise 2 or 3 amps of 12v for the fan and fuel pump. Mine is 5kW which equates to about 17,000 btu. They make them in 2, 3, 5 and 8 kW.

The little pulsing fuel pump clicks with each pump (1 - 3 times per second) and might annoy some, but I don't care because...warmth. Ha. In camper/van applications, that fuel pump is typically mounted under the vehicle where it won't be heard. It uses so little diesel that I typically start it when at the gas station and let it run the 30 - 45 minutes while driving to the trailhead.

My trailer isn't insulated, so it doesn't really keep up at highway speed, but as soon as I slow down and am driving to the trailhead and pull in and park, it's making ground and blowing full heat. It takes about 10 minutes for it to blow full heat so one could also start it the second you pull into the parking lot or right before, then it would be blowing full heat by the time you parked and unloaded the sleds and started to change. It's best to run them for 30+ minutes at a time to keep them clean. If you do run them for shorter periods, just fire it up every couple weeks and let it run for an hour to clean them out.

Many tips and trips to set them up and things to look for are online (possible change fuel lines to a different material as some come with larger diameter, softer hose rather than the hard vinyl, small diameter that are proper, etc.) but do an internet search for "diesel parking heater" and you'll have a months worth of videos (tests, setup, sources, fuel line, fuel tank, etc.). Besides price, the main reason I went with this is diesel I can get at any gas station and can self server. I dislike going and getting propane filled).

The little 2 gallon fuel tank mine came with I've only filled twice and I have a lot of hours on it so far this season. I'd guess it burns 1/4 gallon in 45 minutes on high (you can adjust the pulse tempo of the fuel pump which changes btu output). There are videos out there with tests to measure fuel burn which would give you a better idea than my eyeball estimate. It takes them 5 - 10 minutes to shut down once you click off (glow plug comes back on, fan revs, fuel stops, fan runs until combustion chamber and heat exchanger fins cool a bit, then fan shuts off).

Attached is a picture of an example of an all-in-one. All the components (heater, fuel pump, and fuel tank) are within the cabinet. You drill a hole in the floor for the exhaust pipe to exit (needs clearance and shields as they run 400 - 500 degrees F. ).

The second picture is of the heater itself (turned upside down to show the combustion intake and combustion exhaust). The fan pulls cabin air in one end of the heater and out the other end. So it is truly vented and cabin air is separate from combustion air, so no condensation like ventless propane heat (like buddy heaters, etc.) which I found frustratingly wet.

If I think of it, when we are out riding this weekend, I'll try to click a few pics of my trailer and setup.

diesel heater 1.JPG
diesel heater 2.JPG
 
Last edited:
Premium Features