To Hone or to replace wall? First time rebuild on 06 1000 SDI *Help*

Jan 4, 2020
17
4
3
Marysville
Hello, looking for tips on what to do next.
Working on the top end of my 06 Summit 1000 SDI and I found the ring on the Primary side piston looks to have had some slap or something causing it to weld the rings to the piston and wall which caused some damage to the wall itself
First time finding damage on this, I got the sled for very cheap, should I just gone the cylinder to smooth it out without removing too much material?
Want to get through the rest of the season before performing full tear down this summer.



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o2bncamo

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Nov 7, 2009
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wisconsin
If there is Nikasil plating missing you can't run it, it won't last. I would take some muriatic acid and take the aluminum off the cylinder and rings.
The muriatic acid dissolves the aluminum. Do it in a ventilated area. Use a Q-tip to apply, it will take several applications.
When the aluminum is gone you can take a good look at the plating to see if it is intact. If the plating is in decent shape you can run it.
I wouldn't hone it until you are going to put new pistons in it.
 

Marty UT

Stirring the pot
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Nov 29, 2007
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I have some misc. 1000 parts kickin around the garage too. Not sure what all I have anymore, but if you're looking for something specific, let me know and I'll see if I have it. 🙂
 
Dec 21, 2016
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Save yourself the time; flush a handful of $100 bills down the toilet, kick yourself in the nuts, and sell the sled now before putting any more money into it.

The 1000sdi is a torque beast when it is running right, but it’s a high maintenance girl without a doubt. That is one engine that I’d be afraid of doing only a top end on, and definitely wouldn’t go aftermarket for pistons or rotating assembly. When the rod bearings let go; and they will, it will crack the lower case- and a good matched pair will run you $400-$500. It will cost you $2000-$3000 to rebuild that engine top to bottom; doing things the right way, and taking no shortcuts. I’m talking a oem crank/pistons/bearings, reeds, injector cleaning, cylinder remanufacturing/piston matching, gaskets, seals, wiring & ground upgrades, low-pressure fuel pump upgrade, filtration upgrades to prevent belt dust from finding its way into your top end, etc. The unfortunate part then is, that you’re left with a sled not worth much more than that. I had a used Mach Z 1000 for a few years, which taught me a lot about maintaining sleds. I rebuilt it and set it up right, with good shocks from Hygear, extrovert drivers, new chain/gears/1.75” track, SwainTech costed pipe, re-mapped ECU, plugged decompression ports, RK Tek domes, oil injection adjusted to 32:1, and a host of other upgrades. It was the single most expensive learning experience I’ve ever undergone. I had a lot of fun working on it; however in the end, I eventually found that it was not by any means cheaper than buying a new sled. I missed out on a lot of riding due to that machine over two already short seasons. I kept it as a spare for 2-3 seasons after buying a new 2016, but never did feel I could trust it long term. It was a blast to ride though; she was one powerful pig of a snowmobile. Figure I had about $10k into it over the course of 4-5 seasons, sold it for $2,800.

Moral of my story/rant; know what you’re getting into (and be honest with yourself) before throwing your money away. And you will be throwing it away.
 
Save yourself the time; flush a handful of $100 bills down the toilet, kick yourself in the nuts, and sell the sled now before putting any more money into it.

The 1000sdi is a torque beast when it is running right, but it’s a high maintenance girl without a doubt. That is one engine that I’d be afraid of doing only a top end on, and definitely wouldn’t go aftermarket for pistons or rotating assembly. When the rod bearings let go; and they will, it will crack the lower case- and a good matched pair will run you $400-$500. It will cost you $2000-$3000 to rebuild that engine top to bottom; doing things the right way, and taking no shortcuts. I’m talking a oem crank/pistons/bearings, reeds, injector cleaning, cylinder remanufacturing/piston matching, gaskets, seals, wiring & ground upgrades, low-pressure fuel pump upgrade, filtration upgrades to prevent belt dust from finding its way into your top end, etc. The unfortunate part then is, that you’re left with a sled not worth much more than that. I had a used Mach Z 1000 for a few years, which taught me a lot about maintaining sleds. I rebuilt it and set it up right, with good shocks from Hygear, extrovert drivers, new chain/gears/1.75” track, SwainTech costed pipe, re-mapped ECU, plugged decompression ports, RK Tek domes, oil injection adjusted to 32:1, and a host of other upgrades. It was the single most expensive learning experience I’ve ever undergone. I had a lot of fun working on it; however in the end, I eventually found that it was not by any means cheaper than buying a new sled. I missed out on a lot of riding due to that machine over two already short seasons. I kept it as a spare for 2-3 seasons after buying a new 2016, but never did feel I could trust it long term. It was a blast to ride though; she was one powerful pig of a snowmobile. Figure I had about $10k into it over the course of 4-5 seasons, sold it for $2,800.

Moral of my story/rant; know what you’re getting into (and be honest with yourself) before throwing your money away. And you will be throwing it away.
can I get a big Amen 😬
 

wwracer

Well-known member
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Dec 6, 2007
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Island Park ID
AAAMEN, my reformed 1 Litre friends!! Been there, done that... dropped a small fortune on her. She was hell on ski's, but after about 3 hrs. I was ready to get off and ride Jr's 600 summit. In the end, I don't regret it, learned a lot with her, and after parting it out I almost didn't lose my ass
 

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