snow tires on trailer?

boondocker97

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 30, 2008
3,248
1,670
113
Billings MT
Bringing this back up.

My gooseneck enclosed snowmobile trailer is due for tires this year, and I was thinking that since it is primarily used in the winter time I'd try to find some trailer tires that are more suited for snow and ice. Something that could be studded would be ideal. However, it seems such a thing doesn't exist. At least in the 225-75-15 size that's on the trailer. BTW the trailer has three 5200lb axles, but only has about 9000lb sitting on the trailer wheels when it's loaded. I thought maybe looking into a light truck tire in that size would improve the selection but the load ratings are pretty low. Going up a size to 235-75-15 I found a Cooper passenger snow tire with a 109 load index rating which is 2271lb. That would be about 13,600lb combined with all six tires and covers my 9000lb load. Thing that scares me about that though is they are still only a 4ply tire according to the Load Range rating. Seems like that is asking for trouble. Especially since the rear most axle scrubs the tires pretty hard anytime you have to turn much of a sharp corner on the asphalt.

I do have a set of chains for the trailer if things get real bad, and buddies with smaller trailers and sled decks we can take when conditions are poor. Would just be nice to tailor the tires to the conditions a little more. What passenger tire brands have you guys had luck with swapping over to your trailers?
 

94fordguy

Well-known member
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
14,562
5,222
113
36
Yakima, Wa.
I ran a set of Hankook winterpike studs on my trailer for 5 years before I sold the trailer and was extremely happy with them. The trailer was LOCKED to the road on any condition and actually saved me from the ditch a few times when I used the manual overide on the brake controller to slow the truck instead of the truck brakes (think water on polished ice!). They don't make that exact size any more, but I do know whenever I get back into another enclosed trailer, I will definitely be running a set of studs on it for the winter. Those tires were technically car tires, but I never had any issues. I've never run studs on my trucks because I sled way longer than what studs are legal for in Wa so I always run BFGs on the truck and have been extremely happy with the combo.
 

boondocker97

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 30, 2008
3,248
1,670
113
Billings MT
$323 each for just the bare tire!? Seems like an error when you can buy them on the aluminum wheels for $280 each.
 
Dec 20, 2020
99
50
18
For what it’s worth and something to think about, when I was getting new tires for our travel trailer I wanted to put a more aggressive tire on that. The tire shop said you can’t do that because trailer tires and vehicle tires are different and actually if you put a vehicle tire on the trailer it will possibly blow at some point. It’s something to do with the sidewalls aren’t as stiff on a normal tire which the excessive heat from the smaller travel trailer tires causes the blowouts. I guess it wouldn’t be an issue on a snowmobile trailer because of the cold weather but, just something to think about and something that I wasn’t even aware of.

Anyone else heard this, I actually did see a video on YouTube where a guy was explaining the reasoning.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

North Dakota 322

Member
Premium Member
Go feel a trailer sidewall (not on a rim) VS a 10ply truck tire sidewall or even a car tire.
The truck sidewall is way beefier.
(in my case comparing a Goodyear marathon ST to a Goodyear assurance car tire)

Car tires would have big "FOR CAR USE ONLY" on the sidewall if you couldn't use them on a trailer.

The whole thinking behind not using a car or LT tire on a trailer is the fact they last forever compared to a ST tire, and they wouldn't be able to sell you a tire as often.

What tire do you think is built to a higher spec, one carrying human lives or one carrying some plastic and steel?

The only reason a trailer tire says "FOR TRAILER USE ONLY" is so you don't put it on a car.
 

Coldfinger

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
2,290
475
83
Nebraska
Around 2013 I was researching trailer tires for my toy hauler and one thing that was mentioned, true or not, is trailer tires have more UV protection from sun damage.

I would browse some camper owner web sites and see what they are saying about tires. Just an idea.
 

boondocker97

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 30, 2008
3,248
1,670
113
Billings MT
I did ask about it on one of the pickup forums I'm on in the gooseneck/RV towing section. Was pretty much told just to chain up when I need to. I don't think a lot of those folks understand how far we as snowmobilers willingly travel on really crappy roads!
 

summ8rmk

Most handsome
Lifetime Membership
Premium Member
Feb 16, 2008
11,846
5,329
113
yakima, wa.
With 2 or more axles, the trailer tires will have much more torsional stress. Cars cannot replicate the same loads ever....
I have personally seen vehicle tires used on tandem axle trailers. They will have cord separation before the tread wears out.
Yes they will work, don't expect the same life span when used on a trailer and inspect for separation before each trip. Blowouts suck and cause some serious damage.

Trailer tires are not designed for the force created from acceleration of drive axles, they will not maintain traction levels when used on a car. Also have a much lower speed rating.

U can absolutely use them however u want, on any vehicle u want, do not expect them to perform as they should when used off label....

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

volcano buster

Well-known member
Nov 26, 2007
3,843
1,257
113
Stayton Oregon
I'm digging way back into the gray matter here. My faint memory serves me that if the vehicle plus trailer is involved in an accident and it can come back to improper or aged tires the insurance company may wish to wash their hands of accepting a claim.
 

hansenmac

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 22, 2012
241
161
43
Deering ND
its hard for me to believe a 90 dollar trailer tire will be better than a truck tire. there is a large amount load on a truck tire when your turning at speed and also wind side load on the vehicle. I think if you buy a quality truck tire your fine.
 

Ox

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Premium Member
Jul 8, 2001
1,104
231
63
NW Ohio
www.midwestproductionmachining.com
With 2 or more axles, the trailer tires will have much more torsional stress. Cars cannot replicate the same loads ever....
I have personally seen vehicle tires used on tandem axle trailers. They will have cord separation before the tread wears out.
Yes they will work, don't expect the same life span when used on a trailer and inspect for separation before each trip. Blowouts suck and cause some serious damage.

Trailer tires are not designed for the force created from acceleration of drive axles, they will not maintain traction levels when used on a car. Also have a much lower speed rating.

U can absolutely use them however u want, on any vehicle u want, do not expect them to perform as they should when used off label....

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
OK now the acceleration point sounds completely bogus to me.

If somehow applied torque is a field in the equazsion of how the tire is designed and built, Shirley they take into account braking.
My trailer is set to doo as much braking as possible w/o sliding the tires too much - with the porpoise of that to be that I still have truck brakes to add in an emergency stop situation.
Braking is going to be a higher trq rating than acceleration.
 

IDspud

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
1,069
835
113
Oakley, ID
In the 1990’s we began supplying our farm trailers and implements with tires by pulling our pickup tires around 30-40 percent so pickups got the fresh tires. I have never seen cord separation or tire failure prior to tread wear need for removal. These are HEAVY highway speed trailers also being beaten in the fields and turned on a dime daily.
A good lt tire is not underbuilt for trailer use.

Another observation we’ve had is in mud and snow a traction non driving tire will roll.
Same situation a smooth tire will push. Nothing bites to spin the tire so it will stop rotating and slide pushing up a show stopper.
 
Premium Features