Question about airbags for women riders

Feb 8, 2018
17
9
3
I went on a riding clinic this past weekend and rented avi gear for the weekend, I found the pack really heavy the first day, I had a couple extra layers and extra gloves/water etc. in there, so the second day I took everything out that I could pack on my sled and it was better but still a bit heavy. It was a snowpulse highmark RAS bag I think.
I know I need to get my own and so I'm looking into my options- it seems a lot of the lighter packs are meant for heli-skiing and are not recommended for snowmobiling so I'm wondering what's the difference and if there's a reason I shouldn't buy something labelled for skiing? I'm thinking of buying something like this https://www.mammut.com/p/2610-01520-5611/ultralight-removable-airbag-30/
 

deanross

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 29, 2010
253
76
28
Susanville Ca.
I'd be interested also. Especially the price. Doesn't seem Mammut's website is very good. when I click on Buy Now, it says it can't find the item?
 

Ryan-41

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
1,655
517
113
Cheyenne, Wyoming
www.myspace.com
Here is a couple YouTube videos on Avalanche Air bag reviews, these guys do a good job of giving a quick run down of each bag including weight and volume.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhNelgZy3gs&list=PLhzTQ4wVAcbJevH6F-KIYeABGgqRe2qhQ


I have a Snow pulse Pro rider 15l and it is great and super light, but you don't have much room once you put a shovel and probe in it. When I upgrade, I think I am going to buy the Snow pulse Spire vest, it is the lightest in its category and has the best protection for trauma during an avalanche.

Good luck,

Ryan
 

jokerman

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 7, 2007
308
148
43
Wy.
Bought the wife Float 22; not to big not to small can pack shovel,probe, extra goggles, gloves, BCA radio,few more items. weight is marginal once you get used to the weight on your back.My 2pennies:face-icon-small-hap
 
Feb 8, 2018
17
9
3
So I did a bit more searching and a bit more research and it seems the main difference is the deployment handle being mounted on the left shoulder not the right. Having never been in a real avalanche scenario and not keen on intentionally landing myself in one I'm wondering how much of an issue this really is? I get that the point is that if the handle is on the right then you still have access to the throttle but the other reality is that you tend to instinctively reach for things with your right hand. Does anyone have some experience or evidence that shows that right shoulder vs left is better for snowmobilers?
 
Oct 4, 2015
471
115
43
Montana
Much like you, I have not been in an avalanche & don't wish to; So my response is only conjecture, but I cannot invision myself willing to let go of the throttle if I saw what was coming at me!! I hope that I would have presence of mind to use my left to pull the "OS" Handle!!
 

Brando18299

Member
Premium Member
Dec 1, 2014
45
6
8
Redmond, WA
So I did a bit more searching and a bit more research and it seems the main difference is the deployment handle being mounted on the left shoulder not the right. Having never been in a real avalanche scenario and not keen on intentionally landing myself in one I'm wondering how much of an issue this really is? I get that the point is that if the handle is on the right then you still have access to the throttle but the other reality is that you tend to instinctively reach for things with your right hand. Does anyone have some experience or evidence that shows that right shoulder vs left is better for snowmobilers?
You can switch the trigger to whatever side you want on the BCA bags. I have a Float 25, packed with shovel, probe, survival, extra gloves, goggles etc. It can be a little heavy.. I personally like having all of that on my persons so I work with it. Will probably go with a 22 or vest next time I switch. Good luck.
 

HenryTheHammer

Member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 11, 2017
43
11
8
Salt Lake City, UT
My wife uses a Pieps Tour Rider 24 with no complaints. Nice thing about it is she can practice with it at no costs and in the event it is used, it can be reset and used again in the field.

I use the larger Tour Pro 34 and love it. the reactive should strap system allows a ton of movement freedom while still being tight and holding the pack securely to your back.
 

Matte Murder

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Premium Member
May 4, 2011
3,492
2,116
113
I’m pretty sure the difference between snowmobile airbags and the rest of the back country world is storage capacity. I carry what I consider the minimum in my Peips 24L (liters, the commie measurement of volume, 3 liters is roughly a gallon) my probe and shovel, bca radio, firestarters, and some snivel gear for warmth in case I get caught over night. My neph-son carries nothing but his probe, shovel and radio. His bag weighs 11lbs and mine is 15lbs. His bag “feels” a lot lighter than mine. I carrya lot of safety crap on my sled. Tools, hypothermia bags, medical gear, food, water, Red Bull’s and more snivel gear like back up goggles and gloves. That’s about 20lbs more.
I’d recommend carrying the absolute least amount of weight in your back pack and for most women a ski/snowboard style air bag is perfect. Don’t get hung up on snowmobile air bags, just bigger and a
Magnet for more weight
 

jdog1

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 30, 2007
349
67
28
46
My wife has the float 22 and it’s perfect for her. I actually like hers over my float 32.
 
Oct 10, 2008
124
40
28
denver,co
My feeling is that if you are still on your sled, concentrate on riding it out, don’t worry a out the bag. Once you fall off pull the trigger so it doesn’t matter which shoulder.
 
Last edited:

NHRoadking

Well-known member
Premium Member
Apr 23, 2012
510
203
43
My feeling is that if you are still on your sled, concentrate on riding it out, don’t worry a out the bag. Once you fall off pull the trigger so it doesn’t matter which shoulder.
That's not the advice I've seen. If you're falling off because you're in the avalanche it may be too late to pull the trigger. The new battery powered air bags may take e a bit longer to inflate and/or not have the same amount of inflation pressure as some of the canister bags too. Another reason not to wait too long to inflate.
 
Premium Features