Polaris RMK Pro and a small girl

Oct 15, 2013
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hey all, I'm posting for a friend...
She just bought a Rmk Pro 800. It's bone stock so far. She is a fairly small women, maybe 125lbs geared up, and is having a hard time handling the sled in pow like she wants. We haven't messed with the set-up yet at all.

Do you ladies have any recommendations for her as a quick baseline of where to start for set-up/changes?

Thanks
 

Scott

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I'm not a lady, but I do have some advice that I've tried to help my wife and son with.


Soften the preload for her on all four shocks. There is a fine point where the happy medium is optimal.

I would consider a narrow front end.
There are some 36" kits that make carving a bit easier.

Might also consider lower handlebars for her by about 2" or 3". I'm 5'8" and the stock bars are slightly tall for me, in my opinion.

Learning that fine skill of getting the feet up furthest into the footwells, weighting the inside foot heavily, while burping the throttle, a slight counter steer all with the right finesse and timing will initiate a carve that she can love.
 

GreenState

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So my wife is the 5'4", 125 lbs and we've been though the same thing.

My wife's sled now:
'13 Pro 155 800
Dan Adams Bars, cut as small as possible.
WRP Seat (Wowmom is right about that one)
Fox Float 3's
Kurts Geardown/Clutching
Alt Impact 36" Kit.

This sled feels NOTHING like stock a Pro anymore. It feels more like a jet-ski for the snow... It's been really cool watching her progress since we've got her sled working for her. Practice is important, but not having the deck stacked against you is important too.

In her opinion, if she could only change 3 things, it would be: a-arms, bars, and seat.
 

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Scott

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So my wife is the 5'4", 125 lbs and we've been though the same thing.

My wife's sled now:
'13 Pro 155 800
Dan Adams Bars, cut as small as possible.
WRP Seat (Wowmom is right about that one)
Fox Float 3's
Kurts Geardown/Clutching
Alt Impact 36" Kit.

This sled feels NOTHING like stock a Pro anymore. It feels more like a jet-ski for the snow... It's been really cool watching her progress since we've got her sled working for her. Practice is important, but not having the deck stacked against you is important too.

In her opinion, if she could only change 3 things, it would be: a-arms, bars, and seat.
Awesome. Thanks for adding that.
Narrower bars...That's what I was also trying to think of.
 

WYsteph

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I am going to have to echo the others.

Shorter bars, I am 5'4" and like the RSI Burandt 5". Not sure if I'm sold on making them narrow? I would see what feels comfortable.

Narrow front end, I feel like I can handle my sled like one of the guys finally! Just less input and more reaction. Love it in powder! It does have some downsides to keep in mind. Those off camber spots on hard pack were you really don't want to sidehill it have become very difficult. Just not enough lead in my pants, even with all my old tricks (moving the rear end down hill, keeping all of my weight on the rear of the board, feathering the throttle just so.) Didn't re-valve my shocks this year and I'm ok with it.


And as silly as it sounds, the biggest difference I made this year was going with electric start. Yeah I know, if you can't start it you can't ride it, bla bla bla. Never had it before and it has really made a huge difference for me. I am not tall, not strong in the shoulders, and left handed. Starting my Pro sucks and as anybody who has rode with me knows how frustrating it was. Was wearing myself out trying to start it. Now I can save my energy for actual riding. :face-icon-small-coo
 

Murph

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Val is 5'2" 115lbs ---rides a 2011 Pro 155 and 163 Pro

Stock chassis with Burandt boards

Stock handlebars, seat,etc
Skis on narrowest setting.

Softened up spring preloads, (careful not to go too far with front track shock-- it is the pivot point for the sled to turn on)

Sidehills, downhill uturns, pow turns like a champ. The hardest thing to learn, is the easiest way to turn, pinning the throttle and get the track spinning


Best mod---- seat time, seat time, seat time, did I mention seat time?
 

CoyoteGirl

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If you don't want to make big purchases, lightening the shock pressure is definitely a must. Otherwise the Floats are nice for ease of experimenting/change.

Handlebars will make a huge difference too! If her elbows are bent she is more than likely out of her "Power zone".

A shorter seat is nice, but I notice allot of the girls riding PROs are quite comfy straddling instead of wrong foot forwarding all the time.

Best mod---- seat time, seat time, seat time, did I mention seat time?
And then as above, except I like to say handlebar time because we are mountain riders.. the seat is for lunch time! ;)
 

PowderGirl

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I'm small (5'4" & under 125 usually ;) ) and I haven't done much to my sled other that adjust my handle bars a little back from stock. I do think softening the suspension will help the sled respond quicker. I would like to narrowing my front end too - I'm on a 14' Pro with 39" stance and when snow conditions are firm or set up, I gave a much harder time pulling my sled over if I'm not in position already to get it on edge. My husband said something about being able to rearrange washers and narrow up to about 38"? Not sure how much of a difference it will make but going to 36" will cost a lot more it sounds like.
 

Murph

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I'm small (5'4" & under 125 usually ;) ) and I haven't done much to my sled other that adjust my handle bars a little back from stock. I do think softening the suspension will help the sled respond quicker. I would like to narrowing my front end too - I'm on a 14' Pro with 39" stance and when snow conditions are firm or set up, I gave a much harder time pulling my sled over if I'm not in position already to get it on edge. My husband said something about being able to rearrange washers and narrow up to about 38"? Not sure how much of a difference it will make but going to 36" will cost a lot more it sounds like.


^^^^try the narrow ski position for sure. It takes 5 minutes to rearrange the spacers to the narrow position and $0.



All of our sleds are set up this way. The other thing to try (and i need to try this also with our sleds) is the Carl's or Rasmussen cut on the skis. Effectively trimming the back outside edge of the ski from spindle to tail-- the edge we fight as we initiate a counter steer. I've always resisted cutting the ski for the non-reversible nature of it but I just need to do it and try it.



At this point, snow would help also!
 
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volcano buster

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Any other thoughts on this?

Looking to upgrade to a Pro for my wife who fits these stats. I will also have a daughter that will likely get a Pro in a couple more years but she is going to be tall and skinny.
 

ProSnoAngel

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First I vote Pro RMK for any small girl! I think it is 1Million times easier to handle than the others, and Mine is stock...

Now I am going to add to the question:

I am 5'4, between 100-115 lbs. and ride a stock 2014 Polaris Pro RMK 155. I FINALLY can counter-steer but it's been a fight (rode for first time ever Jan 2014) I still haven't done any real sidehilling. We sled all mountain, in trees, deep powder, and climbs. We ride in technical areas and I wan/need to be able to really RIDE in those areas. Also we now go alone (BF and I) so getting more technical is a must.

I don't need the seat lower because I can easily swing legs to either side, which I frequently do... if anything the dual gas cans on the back get in the way more. But we need them. :)

So questions:
What changes would make the sled easier to maneuver?

1. When you say soften suspension, how do I know how soft and how would I explain what I would need so BF could make the mod?

2. I ALWAYS stand, NEVER sit, but I get a lot of pain in my thumb/wrist on right hand after just a day or two of ridding (sunup to sundown)... I know it is from the throttle, but don't know how to address... I assume it is the angle my hands are at when standing. Any ideas at all... it actually gets horribly painful by day 4 on the ride back to the truck I am usually cussing in my helmet whole ride back.

3. Rode a 2014 Ski-Doo Sno Pro first time ridding for about 30 mins and thought it was horribly tippy (admittedly it was right after I got used to Pro and 2 years ago). Base on that would you think narrowing skis would be a good idea? How much would you think to narrow them?

4. I hear you all on the automatic start. I start my sled on my own now every time, but by day 2/3 I am getting tired. Of all the mods it is lower on my list I suppose unless someone thinks different...

5. Where should handlebars be set? I always feel like I want them higher because of how leaned forward I always feel but everyone keeps saying lower. Is there a rule of thumb for this?

6. Last ODD question... Since we go the two of us often I have to get myself unstuck in certain situations... and WANT to. I can flip my sled on a hill but getting it upright if it's in a deep flat area is an issue... any tricks? I work out... but the guys will just grab it, pull it over and pick up the track. When I am in deep snow there is no way to get the leverage to get it (so tricks/tips appreciated).

7. Also vote for handlebar time as the best mod!

Tiny backstory... I just sat on a sled for the first time ever January 2014 (As in NEVER before even heard or saw one). My boyfriend got a new 2014 Pro RMK 155. Since he can ride anything and I had never ridden he decided for the first trip to let me use the Pro since it was lighter and he thought easier to maneuver. Yeah... he has probably put 5 miles on it total since... the rest are mine. :)

Since day one I have only done deep powder and mountain riding. Only trail ride to get where we are going. I took to sledding pretty quick... especially loving that my light weight and light sled could get me up higher than some of the guys. My one problem has always been sidehilling and turns in deep powder. Even on the throttle and heavily weighting the inside I couldn't get the counter-steer... until I finally got it this last trip we took (Finally! All it took was one guy saying I was too small I wouldn't get it... I can't stand being told I can't do something). Where I was practicing counter-steering was deep but relatively flat/rolling terrain, so I still haven't got a chance to master sidehilling, which I really want to be able to do.
 

kchester

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ProsnoAngel before you start pouring money into your sled I would look up a riding class for women, taught by women. I have riden with Amber Holt at Backcountry Basics and she knows a ton of tricks/tips that help. She also has a similar build and can relate to you way better than someone like me could. (6'2" 250lbs)

Spend some cash on instruction, you will take that investment to every sled you ride

Sent from my HTC6535LVW using Tapatalk
 

volcano buster

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I also endorse the Amber Holt idea. I'm 6'5" 250# so the sled responds to me whether it wants to or not. I'm still amazed at her ability to help all individuals in her clinic regardless of size and or ability. We had a pregnant gal in our group that was off balance a bit and winded easily, and she still got quite a bit out of the class.
 

CoyoteGirl

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1. You are light enough you can probably soften them all the way and work your way back if it is too soft. Boyfriend should know how to soften the shocks??

2. You can loosen the throttle block a little bit so that you can twist it up/down while riding, get a feel for what position you like it in then tighten it back down. I generally run mine pointed more up than down, don't like my wrist all kinked.

3. Try it, it isn't hard to do! I think there is really only two options, as there is a spacer that you either put on the inside of the spindle or on the outside.

4. All depends on needs and budget. Kinda nice to save the energy!

5. I don't think there is a rule of thumb. Trial and error. You are short enough that rolling them back might work (sounds like it does for the shorter gals) Another thing that isn't hard to experiment with to get it how YOU like it. Put an allen wrench (5mm I think?) and a wrench (10mm??) in your pocket and play with it throughout the day.

6. Flat ground stucks are hard unless you are just a monster. Flat ground flops, try building a base under the handlebars and squating the machine up. Always thing, use your big muscles.

Other trick is to remove as much snow as you can from under the belly pan, skis, running boards. Sometimes if you do this you can get that sled leveled out and get going with some throttle. Track has to be shoveled free usually. WIGGLE... pin and wiggle.. ;)



First I vote Pro RMK for any small girl! I think it is 1Million times easier to handle than the others, and Mine is stock...

Now I am going to add to the question:

I am 5'4, between 100-115 lbs. and ride a stock 2014 Polaris Pro RMK 155. I FINALLY can counter-steer but it's been a fight (rode for first time ever Jan 2014) I still haven't done any real sidehilling. We sled all mountain, in trees, deep powder, and climbs. We ride in technical areas and I wan/need to be able to really RIDE in those areas. Also we now go alone (BF and I) so getting more technical is a must.

I don't need the seat lower because I can easily swing legs to either side, which I frequently do... if anything the dual gas cans on the back get in the way more. But we need them. :)

So questions:
What changes would make the sled easier to maneuver?

1. When you say soften suspension, how do I know how soft and how would I explain what I would need so BF could make the mod?

2. I ALWAYS stand, NEVER sit, but I get a lot of pain in my thumb/wrist on right hand after just a day or two of ridding (sunup to sundown)... I know it is from the throttle, but don't know how to address... I assume it is the angle my hands are at when standing. Any ideas at all... it actually gets horribly painful by day 4 on the ride back to the truck I am usually cussing in my helmet whole ride back.

3. Rode a 2014 Ski-Doo Sno Pro first time ridding for about 30 mins and thought it was horribly tippy (admittedly it was right after I got used to Pro and 2 years ago). Base on that would you think narrowing skis would be a good idea? How much would you think to narrow them?

4. I hear you all on the automatic start. I start my sled on my own now every time, but by day 2/3 I am getting tired. Of all the mods it is lower on my list I suppose unless someone thinks different...

5. Where should handlebars be set? I always feel like I want them higher because of how leaned forward I always feel but everyone keeps saying lower. Is there a rule of thumb for this?

6. Last ODD question... Since we go the two of us often I have to get myself unstuck in certain situations... and WANT to. I can flip my sled on a hill but getting it upright if it's in a deep flat area is an issue... any tricks? I work out... but the guys will just grab it, pull it over and pick up the track. When I am in deep snow there is no way to get the leverage to get it (so tricks/tips appreciated).

7. Also vote for handlebar time as the best mod!

Tiny backstory... I just sat on a sled for the first time ever January 2014 (As in NEVER before even heard or saw one). My boyfriend got a new 2014 Pro RMK 155. Since he can ride anything and I had never ridden he decided for the first trip to let me use the Pro since it was lighter and he thought easier to maneuver. Yeah... he has probably put 5 miles on it total since... the rest are mine. :)

Since day one I have only done deep powder and mountain riding. Only trail ride to get where we are going. I took to sledding pretty quick... especially loving that my light weight and light sled could get me up higher than some of the guys. My one problem has always been sidehilling and turns in deep powder. Even on the throttle and heavily weighting the inside I couldn't get the counter-steer... until I finally got it this last trip we took (Finally! All it took was one guy saying I was too small I wouldn't get it... I can't stand being told I can't do something). Where I was practicing counter-steering was deep but relatively flat/rolling terrain, so I still haven't got a chance to master sidehilling, which I really want to be able to do.
 
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