• I am getting worn out moving your "For sale" threads, including loosely veiled sales pitches for "How much is it worth) or Wanted to buy to the swapmeet.

    I will no longer be moving them for you as I have been in the past.

    Some days are 20 per day.

    If I see it, it will get deleted.

    I try to help you...please try to help me.

    Thanks.
  • I've received emails and PM's asking me about "Group Buys" and promotions.

    A Group Buy here on SnoWestOnline.com would be a situation where a normal member (non vendor or mfg) personally collects orders from other members. That member then uses those orders to negotiate a better price with the Vendor/Mfg for HIS/HER "Group" of buyers.

    Here is an example of a viable "Group Buy"

    http://www.snowestonline.com/forum/showthread.php?t=269222

    A promotion that has the words "Group Buy" in the title is still a promotion, and from the rules that were handed down to me by Harris Publications is that non-advertisers cannot run promotions or open sales programs on the forums outside of the swapmeet.

    If a members wants to become a group buy manager, maintain a thread and collect the funds and negotiate a group buy... as a member, you are welcome to do that as long as you are not attached to the business of the vendor or Mfg.

    If you are a vendor/MFG and you want to offer an EXCLUSIVE "SnoWestOnline ONLY" promotion that is exclusive to snowest readers, please contact me and you'll be able to put it up in the Polaris forums.

    Also, before any vendors/mfgs get all "riled up" over this know that the moderators are strictly volunteers and do not receive a dime from any advertising $$ spent on this site.

    As ALWAYS, since DAY ONE of me becoming a moderator, I have pioneered, supported and encouraged vendors and mfgs in getting the word out to our readers with "New Product Announcements.

    Have a great season.

    From this point on, all vendors/mfg's promoting Pre-Season tiered sales programs, in the Polaris Forums, that are not paid advertisers will be appropriately moved to the swapmeet section of the forums.

    MH

New user - 02 600 RMK

BeartoothBaron

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Hello all, just figured since I'm new I'd introduce myself. I'm Montana-born and raised: I went to college in Billings, spent ten years in the Navy flying airplanes, then moved back last year and currently work in the Air Force reserve. I got into snowmobiling about ten years ago when a friend gave me an old 440 fan Indy, but most of my experience is from my tour in NW Washington riding Mt Baker when I could. My riding has been pretty limited other than those three years and last winter, so I definitely consider myself a novice.

Washington is where I bought my current sled. It's a 600 RMK 136, now at 3700 miles, which I've been gradually upgrading. Nothing major so far; Boyesen reeds, Holtzmann ATACC, and a Cobra windshield are the most significant additions. Most significant downgrade was an SLP can; too little power/weight difference to be worth riding with earplugs, I went back to OEM. Has a new primary (long story) and rebuilt secondary clutch, to which I plan to add adjustable weights. Even with the clutch work, new springs and weights matching the service manual recommended setup, it over-revs (around 8400 peak). I'm leaning towards SLP Magnum Force weights and more tuning to fix that. Other upgrades coming include a 144 track from an '03 800 that I picked up recently (the original skid and track I plan to use for a project, another Indy trail I have), some Powder Pro skis, and a full set of Ryde FX clicker shocks I’ve been able to scrounge.

Obviously, I really like the sled. The 600 has been dead-reliable, it's never broken on me - despite some newbie attempts to break it - and the power is plenty for my riding ability. My goal is to maximize the deep snow and mountain ability without running out of power or making it difficult to handle in the backwoods and trails, so I'm hoping the 144 is the sweet spot for that. Basically, I'm looking to turn it into a tricked-out all-rounder. I may end up buying a newer sled when my abilities out-grow this one and/or I have money to burn, but I can't imagine parting with it.

Anyway, I’m sure that's plenty about me. I've got no burning "how do I" questions at the moment, but I'm happy to hear any "you might wanna" suggestions on my sled!
 
Jun 23, 2004
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144 is a good addition. I'd port the crap out of the track. 3-5 holes across to lighten it up and spin easier.
Gear it down and get a reccomended proven clutch setup for your gearing and altitude.
Ice scratchers, handlebar risers, hot pocket cooker and let er rip.
Pull the sway bar and narrow up the skis stance to help side hilling.

And make sure it's jetted for where you ride too.
 

BeartoothBaron

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Thanks for the response. I've done some jetting on it last season, and with the ATACC I should be able to leave the base at 4000' (where I live) and be covered as high up as I'm likely to get. I think some adjustable weights, and possibly a spring change, will get the clutching dialed in.

With regard to porting the track, is there a good DIY writeup on that? I've got a good drill motor and several sizes of hole saws - guessing I have all the tools I'd need, but I don't want to screw it up or overdo it. That said, it's an original track (4700 miles, but no tears or lugs missing), there's a decent chance I'll be upgrading it down the road, so it doesn't have to last forever...
 

whoisthatguy

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Although you obviously sound real excited about upgrading a 136" track to a 144, 144's are still not "powder" sleds. They are glorified heavy trail sleds and can only handle up to about 18" of powder. Which is completely inadequate. for 30" of powder or more, you need a real powder sled. Powder sleds are 151" x 2" lugs, 159" x 2" in the edge series. Going with a camoplast extreme track with 3 lugs across, is a significant upgrade from the 4 lug across Polaris tracks. You gave a long list of upgrades that amounts to a lot of money to put into a 136" x probably 1/1/2" lug track. Your money would be much better spent by finding an 02, 03, 04 or 05 800cc Edge x 2" lug x 151" track or longer. Both a 151" track and a 159" track fit on the exact same sled, so you can upgrade to a 159", if you buy a 151". Which can be had for $2500 or less. ATACC goes bad after 2 years. Mine did anyways. For an 800cc sled, you don't really need to use more than one main jet settings, unless you get above 8000 feet, which a 600 cc sled in going to have great difficulty in doing anyways. The extra HP in an 800cc sled is not a big deal. You will quickly adjust. Don't underestimate yourself. You only need to put about (8) - 1" diameter holes in a track to empty out most of the snow. By putting 3 holes across, you seriously weaken the track and can cause it to tear.

If you are in Washington or Oregon, I have an extra 800cc sled with a new top end (148 psi compression) that I should probably sell because I just bought another fixer upper sled and don't need 2 spares. Mint condition 02 Snow Check Special 800cc Edge 151" x 2" track, with an extra used 159" x 2" lug track loose, that you can put on when you get motivated. $2200 Everything is stock, except the rear/rear shock is an upgrade and the air horns are loose. Main jets at 400. Needles at #2. New belt. $50 extra for spare belt. Lots of recently new bearings. Then you will have a real powder sled, and don't have to try to build something that will never get you what you are looking for.
 
Last edited:

BeartoothBaron

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I'm not, at the moment, looking for anything all-out, just to trick out what I've got. You're right that a 144 isn't going to make it a big powder sled, but by the time I part out the rest of the sled the pieces are coming from, that part will be practically free. I plan to keep this sled as a general purpose sled with some mountain ability; when I need something more, I'll probably be looking more towards a Pro-RMK or similar. I'll cross that bridge when I get there.
 

gonehuntnpowder

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I wouldn't be too worried about too much track on that 600. Knew a few people who who did 159 tracks on 660 big bored edges. Very impressive. As I remember sno west built around that vintage as a project sled.
 

Flying Dutchman

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Dec 14, 2007
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Red Deer
Well, in the old days we would try anything to get the sled moving better. Porting tracks was simple and cost nothing.
Here's a stock Polaris track with a couple holes per pitch. You could get away with 3 but no more. Don't cut holes on the outside edge, keep them between the hifax. Also keep them in a straight line, don't stagger them. Remember tracks are made with strings/fibers that run length wise. Staggering the holes will cut every string and weaken the track. In this case after a couple years, the track was still in the great shape.
As for the cutting tool, I used a 1-1/4" holesaw. Grind off the teeth, and bevel the INSIDE leaving you with a sharp cutting edge. Leave the outer edge straight. The inside bevel will keep the hole edges square instead of puckering. Once warmed up, it will cut through like butter.
Make a little wood template to lay in between the track paddles. Drill a small 1/4" as a pilot to keep them all lined up. Then go back later with the hole saw.
As for swapping in a 144, that too is a good improvement over the 136. If you're getting these parts for cheap, there's nothing wrong with building your machine up. good luck with your project
 

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BeartoothBaron

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Thanks for the info, FlyingDutchman, clears up a lot! I think I'll do the two-hole port job as shown, but try to space it out so I can add a third if I think it'll help. Only other question I can think of is how best to set up the track to be drilled. I've read of people doing it with the track on the sled, but since it'll be off, I'd think it would be a lot easier to set up a couple 2x4s on some saw horses (plus no worries about hitting something on the skid).

I'm looking forward to getting the swap done, but right now I'm waiting for my "new" shocks to get here. In the meantime, we've had enough snow this past week to do a little riding up in the hills; she's running great!
 

Flying Dutchman

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I've done them on the machine, but can only drill a few at a time. If track is out, that would be ideal. Your 2x4 sawhorse idea should work, just need a little support on the track. One warning is that it will smoke A LOT. Doing this outside is best, otherwise your neighbor may call the fire dept.
 

whoisthatguy

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Don't ever attempt to cross any width of water that is deeper than 12", because you will get zero flotation with that many holes in the track. I prefer to add only enough holes to clear out the snow as fast as it comes in, and have enough track left to give me sufficient flotation to keep me out of a jam when playing follow the leader.
 

BeartoothBaron

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Yeah, I hear what you're saying about floatation. I've never had to cross any significant amount of water, so that shouldn't be a problem at least. After more reading, I'm thinking I'll do two holes on the back side (relative to track movement) of each center lug. As I understand it, that still expels plenty of snow with minimal loss in floatation. The idea of doing more to reduce track weight appeals to me, but apparently it takes a ton of porting to make an appreciable difference, and then you risk track failure and lose a lot of floatation.

Anyway, I got my rebuilt shocks back, so I'll be going to work on the transplant soon. Gotta get that done, never know when the next big snow is coming!
 

sno*jet

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you could probably sell both those tracks in the swapmeet here and pay for a 159 series 4 from tracks usa. they used to have them on special with rail extensions. its a 2.125" so it will out perform any of the 2 inchers except maybe the good ol camoplast challenger. dont port too much, you never know when a water hole will pop up. i like those 600s. try to find some lightweight trailing arms. also the newer parts from the vertical escapes or extremes the last couple years of those 800s have lightweight jackshafts, seats, and probably other stuff i cant remember but keep an eye out for those they get parted out all the time when those big blocks fail. i used a bar riser on mine that had an angled cut at bottom so it raised bars straight up not, not pushing you farther back, i think it was made by ole's machine, nice and stout. someone still makes board inserts for those too so you cut out the center section and rivet in new piece with large holes for snow to evacuate.
 

BeartoothBaron

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Well, after a great finish to last year, I've now got no good snow nearby, so I'm prepping the track to swap in. My timing seems to be fortunate on that: the speedo just died, and with 4000 miles it's probably due for bearings. I got the 800 torn down, so all the pieces are out. In addition to the track and skid, I'm going to swap the lower gear and chain, so go from 19/39 gearing to 19/41. Not a huge gear-down, but it's free at this point.

I decided to port the track and open the closed windows, but nothing crazy. I'm mainly looking to improve snow elimination with as little effect on floatation as possible. Seems it takes a ton of porting to really cut track weight anyway (in addition to the labor), so I'm just going to do two rows, alternating sides so each port falls just behind a lug. One other thing I'm considering is removing some drive lugs. I'm wondering if the non-clipped outer lugs do anything at all, and if I'd cause problems if I, say, remove half the inner ones by alternating back and forth between the two rows. I've got a multi-tool that I think would take them off quite easily, but I want to make sure this isn't a bad idea without anti-ratchet drivers.

Where I go from here, I'm still not sure. It just depends on how quickly I get comfortable riding in more challenging conditions and how soon before the sled is the main thing holding me back. It may give me everything I need for several more seasons, or I might decide I need a lot more sooner rather than later – in which case I'd probably be looking for a Pro-RMK or such unless I win the lottery. The sled is definitely worth keeping, especially with the add-ons I've got – not to mention my friends are too cheap to get sleds of their own...
 

whoisthatguy

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Porting the track does not increase snow elimination because the ports are below the slide rail. All you need is about 10 - 1" dia. holes in the track, between the slide rails and between the raised lugs, to eliminate the snow. Anymore than that could cause the sled to rapidly sink in water crossings. Do not cut off any drive lugs, unless you intend to throw the track away.
 

BeartoothBaron

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Got it, thanks. I know I've read somewhere about people removing some of the drive lugs, maybe that was with anti-ratchet drivers? Also, does that include the non-driven lugs on the outside? Seems the ones that aren't clipped don't do anything.
 

retiredpop

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The track sprockets still use the lugs whether they are clipped or not. The clips are there to provide a low friction surface for the hyfax. The reason for not clipping every window is merely to save weight.
 

BeartoothBaron

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Well, done porting and cutting windows. I modified a hole saw as recommended by FlyingDutchman, and that worked really well. I just used moderate pressure and let the heat do the rest – made for nice even cuts and the melted rubber seemed to seal off the cords. Really, the holes for the ports were pretty easy – probably a couple hours work start to finish on those. Using a couple 2-bys and sawhorses as pictured held it in place really well. I used a utility knife on the windows, and that was a lot more work. Even with a sharp new blade it takes a lot of effort. I guess I could have hole-sawed them; at least this way my options are wide open if I decide to upgrade the drivers (probably not worth it though?).

As for my porting pattern, I set it up so each port falls immediately behind a lug. That's based on the theory that as the track moves through the snow, it creates sort of a vacuum behind it. If true, I should lose little, if any, floatation (maybe even on water). If not true, worst case is I'll shopping for a new track next season. For now I just need to get it in and back on the snow! As for weight loss, the pieces I cut out came to 1.36lbs. My impression from what I'd read was that porting for weight reduction is a questionable proposition. Based on this, I'd think no way are you going to shed lots of weight without killing floatation, plus there's the question of how far you can go before you make the track too weak. Then again, I think about these things too much – tends to happen when the good snow is hours away!
 

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whoisthatguy

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The track sprockets still use the lugs whether they are clipped or not. The clips are there to provide a low friction surface for the hyfax. The reason for not clipping every window is merely to save weight.
The clips are in a different line from the drive sprockets. The clips are in line with the slide rails. The track lugs are in line with the track drive sprockets.
 

whoisthatguy

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Well, done porting and cutting windows. I modified a hole saw as recommended by FlyingDutchman, and that worked really well. I just used moderate pressure and let the heat do the rest – made for nice even cuts and the melted rubber seemed to seal off the cords. Really, the holes for the ports were pretty easy – probably a couple hours work start to finish on those. Using a couple 2-bys and sawhorses as pictured held it in place really well. I used a utility knife on the windows, and that was a lot more work. Even with a sharp new blade it takes a lot of effort. I guess I could have hole-sawed them; at least this way my options are wide open if I decide to upgrade the drivers (probably not worth it though?).

As for my porting pattern, I set it up so each port falls immediately behind a lug. That's based on the theory that as the track moves through the snow, it creates sort of a vacuum behind it. If true, I should lose little, if any, floatation (maybe even on water). If not true, worst case is I'll shopping for a new track next season. For now I just need to get it in and back on the snow! As for weight loss, the pieces I cut out came to 1.36lbs. My impression from what I'd read was that porting for weight reduction is a questionable proposition. Based on this, I'd think no way are you going to shed lots of weight without killing floatation, plus there's the question of how far you can go before you make the track too weak. Then again, I think about these things too much – tends to happen when the good snow is hours away!
Although this method may only take a couple of hours, the removal and reinstallation of the track involves removing the chain case, the drive axle, 4 bolts that tend to spin since the other end cannot be held in place, muscling the rear suspension out of the sled, all before the track can be removed. And then the event is reversed to reinstall. That will add at least 5 hours to this 2 hour drilling. When in fact, the holes can be drilled with the track still in place on the sled.
 

sno*jet

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the holes look good, you didnt overdo it like most people:face-icon-small-coo
whenever we took a track out of those sleds we always added outer drivers to the drive shaft. all pre-97 rmks used to come this way. they grip those outer lugs and allow you to run the track a little looser without ratcheting. looser track spin easier. I liked this better than extrovert drivers i tried once. i know all the new sleds run extros now but the 4 introvert drivers spin smoother. a little tougher getting the driveshaft in and out but not as bad as extros.
 
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