Motion Sickness

niles

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Does anyone else out there get motion sick riding?
I do and its to the point where if I don't find a cure, or someway to ride without throwing up on a regular basis I will have to find another hobby.
Any ideas what to try or take? Elevation has no effect as I feel equally ****ty riding at home or out west.
 

richracer1

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Your not riding one of them XMs are you, rockin back-n-forth?

Now seriously, have you tried Dramamine or some other motion sickness meds?


Edit: Apparently the person below doesn't have a sense of humor.....thanks for the bad rep, jerk.
 
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AndrettiDog

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Edit: Apparently the person below doesn't have a sense of humor.....thanks for the bad rep, jerk.
Hey, you've done it to me too. Looks like they are getting dished out to everyone anyway.
 

niles

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Have tried Dramamine and prescription anti nausea pills. I usually pop a Dramamine as soon as I wake in the morning and nausea pills as needed.
I have not tried the Ginger, but I will next chance I get. Even went to the doctor and they said I was wired like that. It sucks that the older I get the worse the conditions. Don't strap my helmet any more, to many close calls.
Any one else have any suggestions? I have not heard of a lot of the things you mentioned mountain horse. Any details?
 

richracer1

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Hey, you've done it to me too. Looks like they are getting dished out to everyone anyway.
BugIto: Which post, I don't remember. Usually only give them out when I receive one I think is BS.


To Niles, I wish you luck finding a way to deal with it. It would definitely suck to have that condition.
 

akstormin

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So I'm guessing if your body is that sensitive to motion then you probably also have problems in cars/buses/airplanes/boats etc... So it would seem that you probably deal with this problem on a regular basis. Do the normal solutions not work when sledding? Or if you don't have problems in cars and planes then maybe it is something snowmobile specific? Exhaust smell, helmet limiting vision or putting pressure on your head... Just trying to think outside the box a little. Do you have the same problems on bright clear days or is it worse on cloudy limited vis days? Usually, but not always, a good defined horizon helps, so wondering if you've noticed any differences. That's all I've got, hope you find an answer.
 

Bturton

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Transderm V patches.
After suffering a head injury, I wear these every weekend and it solved all my motionsickness symptoms.
$7 a patch and they last for three days. My doctor says no worries about long term usage.
Causes a damn dry mouth though!


Turts
 

polaris dude

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Your not riding one of them XMs are you, rockin back-n-forth?

Now seriously, have you tried Dramamine or some other motion sickness meds?


Edit: Apparently the person below doesn't have a sense of humor.....thanks for the bad rep, jerk.
Oh lawdy. It was an accident I used my new iphone to browse and must have hit the down by accident. Do I seem like the type of person to get offended at XM jokes? But its good to know your mature and you didn't hit me back u big baby :face-icon-small-win



@OP I've heard somewhere that if you squeeze one of your thumbs or your index finger on one hand or something that it will reduce nausea. I can't find a link to verify it, but here is a link to other options that I am not as sure actually work.
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/pressure-points-for-nausea.html
 

niles

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I do get car sick, air sick, and sometimes even lawnmower sick. Heat has a lot to do with it as well, and I try to ride without goggles whenever possible. I have since stopped at Walmart and grabbed some ginger pills.
 
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I had this problem years ago. Dramamine helped some but I found I couldn't wear a helmet that was very snug at all. Had that helmet for years and had no problem then out of the blue it became an issue. Bought a bigger helmet and it went away. Good luck. That is no fun
 
Feb 8, 2008
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I have shared in your problem on more than one occasion. Dramamine helps, sometimes. One solution for me has been drinking ginger ale when its available.
The best way I have found to fight it is to keep my body on the cool side, lots of fresh air in my face (no breath deflectors), and very clean goggles.
The only time it affects me is when I'm lazily going down a trail and letting my head bobble with the bumps and ruts. If I ride aggressive and no let my head bobble around I have zero problems.
 

MTsled3

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I have noticed myself feeling slight motion sickness sometimes early in the mornings riding the trail up, but by the time we get off the trail it is usually gone. I got a bad snowmobile related concussion about 6 years ago(no helmet, stupid, and I was only 13), and since then I can no longer go on even the little kid rides at the fair in the summer. Even ski lifts get me feeling sick sometimes
 
Dec 15, 2008
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Good luck to the OP, I never even thought about motion sickness (for a similar problem). I few years ago I would throw up after/during every ride, almost made me want to quit riding. Through the day I would gradually start to feel worse until the point I would just sit on the trail and just want to head back. Many things went through my head: small degree of hypothermia, cabon monoxide (unlikely outside) or smell of yami-lube, physical exhaustion hucking that yami tripple around, ect. But never once thought about motion sickness. There are still times where I feel the same way, but not nearly as often so I will look forward to seeing what solutions you find, and may try some Dramamine myself.
 
Feb 5, 2010
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Have you tried the rubber band with the magnet or what it is on there?
My girlfriend uses that one when shes on a bus, car, plane, boat and so on and that`s the only one that helps her against motion sickness.
 

mountainhorse

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As with most... best to take before you get sick...

I've seen great results with motion sickness with good quality Ginger pills for my clients that get sick on boats... best to pay a bit more at the Natural store.. probably better ingredients than the ones at Wallmart.

Scopolamine = patch... as posted above

Meclazine = Bonine/Antivert

Dimenhydrinate = Drammamine... but makes some drowsy
 

FatDogX

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Besides the above mentioned remedies I would try and shop around and see if you can find any kind of doctors that specialize in motion sickness.

Or.........................................Sign up for a season on Deadliest Catch and after a season on those boats, your body will hopefully fix it self!!!! ha ha.

Hang in there and good luck!!
 

Jeff C

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Self-care

You may be able to relieve the symptoms of motion sickness by using the self-care techniques below.

Minimise head and body movements - If possible, choose a seat or cabin in the middle of a boat or plane because this is where you will experience the least movement. Using a pillow or a headrest may help keep your head as still as possible.
Fix your vision on a stable object - For example, look at the horizon. Do not read or play games because this may make your symptoms worse. Closing your eyes may help relieve symptoms.
Get some fresh air - If possible, open the windows or move to the top deck of a ship to get a good supply of fresh air. Avoid getting too hot.
Relax - Relax by listening to music while focusing on your breathing or carrying out a mental activity, such as counting backwards from 100.
Food and drink - Avoid eating large meals or drinking alcohol before travelling.
Stay calm - Keep calm about the journey. You may be more likely to experience motion sickness if you worry about it.

Medication

Several medications can be used to treat motion sickness. However, as motion sickness delays digestion, your body will not absorb medication as well if you take it when you already have symptoms. It is usually better to take medication before your journey to prevent symptoms developing.
Hyoscine

Hyoscine, also known as scopolamine, is widely used to treat motion sickness. It is thought to work by blocking some of the nerve signals sent from the vestibular system in your inner ear that can cause nausea and vomiting (see causes of motion sickness for more information about the vestibular system).

Hyoscine is available over the counter from pharmacists. For it to be effective, you will need to take hyoscine before you travel. If you are about to go on a long journey, such as a sea journey, hyoscine patches can be applied to your skin every three days.

Common side effects of hyoscine include:

drowsiness
blurred vision
dry mouth
dizziness
constipation

Due to these side effects, never take hyoscine if you are going on a car journey and plan to drive for all or part of the way.

Rarer side effects of hyoscine include:

nausea
vomiting
mental confusion, particularly in elderly people

Hyoscine should be used with caution in children and elderly people. It should also be used with caution if you have:

epilepsy - a condition that causes fits
a history of kidney or liver problems
a history of heart problems
a history of some digestive system problems, such as gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

If any of the above applies to you, consult your GP or pharmacist before taking hyoscine.
Antihistamines

Antihistamines are an alternative type of medicine to hyoscine. They are often used to treat symptoms of allergies, but can also control nausea and vomiting. Antihistamines are slightly less effective at treating motion sickness than hyoscine, but may cause fewer side effects.

There are several different types of antihistamines, including some that cause drowsiness. Antihistamines used to treat motion sickness that cause drowsiness include:

promethazine
cyclizine
cinnarizine


These are usually taken as tablets one or two hours before your journey. If it is a long journey, you may need to take a dose every eight hours.

As well as drowsiness, these medicines may also cause:

headaches
pins and needles
a dry mouth
blurred vision

Complementary therapies

Several complementary therapies have been suggested for motion sickness, although the evidence for their effectiveness is mixed.
Ginger

It has been suggested that taking ginger supplements may help prevent symptoms of motion sickness. Ginger is sometimes used for other types of nausea, such as morning sickness during pregnancy.

There is little research specifically into the use of ginger to treat motion sickness, but ginger does have a long history of being used as a remedy for nausea and vomiting. Some studies that investigated the use of ginger for motion sickness found a benefit, while others found no benefit at all.

As well as ginger supplements, many other ginger products are available, including ginger biscuits and ginger tea. If you use ginger products, buy them from a reputable source, such as a pharmacist or supermarket. Before taking ginger supplements, check with your GP that they will not affect any other medication you may be taking.

In some cases, ginger can cause mild side effects, such as diarrhoea and heartburn.
Acupressure bands

Acupressure bands are stretchy bands worn around your wrists. They apply pressure to a particular point on the inside of your wrist between the two tendons that run down your inner arm.

Some complementary therapists have claimed that using an acupressure band can be an effective method of treating motion sickness.

However, there is little research into acupressure bands used specifically to treat motion sickness.


Antihistamines have helped me greatly while scuba diving to keep my ears clear. Without them I get vertigo real bad sometimes.

Give them a try, you might just have alot of fluid in your inner ear and you dont even realize it........
 
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