How much power does the 2020 Arctic cat Alpha make?? SEE HERE!

tenacious84

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What is really dumb is people thinking their sled pulls hard in the midrange:ROFLMAO:
try looking at it from a different perspective. at it each rpm interval the engine is going to make a particular amount of horsepower, this is irrelevant of throttle position. for example, at say 6000 rpm, it is always going to be putting out the same amount of horsepower, whether the rpm's are going up (wide open throttle), going down (letting off throttle), or steady state (cruising or side-hilling). there are obvious exceptions to this when the fuel mixture, air density, or other input factors change. however, 6000 rpm will always be the same when the inputs are the same.

If a person is attempting to side-hill, they are not going wide open, they aren't going to be burping it either, they'll likely be running 6000-7000 rpm steady state feathering it as needed. In those instances, the more HP you have at the lower rpm, the easier the sled is going to be to control.
 

Motorbreath_

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You guys crack me up, you need to think about this, not just react... FACT, the dyno numbers are taken at WOT. At less than WOT in the midrange you are not making those numbers and all the similarly sized motors make about the same midrange power. So if you are just burping it along you are not anywhere near utilizing any improvement in midrange, you CAN'T unless you can get your sled to hold low rpm at WOT like they do on the dyno. As soon as you go WOT and start making the power shown on the dyno graph, you are out of the midrange and running in the peak power section AS DESIGNED. More midrange, way to make up some BS trying to make yourselves look smart... Fact is you can not run your sled WOT in the midrange so you NEVER realize those gains. It is just part of the power curve you can not utilize on a sled.
I honestly thought you were smarter than this..
 

Big10inch

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Mar 11, 2018
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try looking at it from a different perspective. at it each rpm interval the engine is going to make a particular amount of horsepower, this is irrelevant of throttle position. for example, at say 6000 rpm, it is always going to be putting out the same amount of horsepower, whether the rpm's are going up (wide open throttle), going down (letting off throttle), or steady state (cruising or side-hilling). there are obvious exceptions to this when the fuel mixture, air density, or other input factors change. however, 6000 rpm will always be the same when the inputs are the same.

If a person is attempting to side-hill, they are not going wide open, they aren't going to be burping it either, they'll likely be running 6000-7000 rpm steady state feathering it as needed. In those instances, the more HP you have at the lower rpm, the easier the sled is going to be to control.
False premise ruins this argument. At 6000 rpm the power IS NOT the same regardless of throttle position. The ONLY time it is making the power on the dyno graph is at WOT. 6000 rpm is NOT always the same HP, closed throttle it is ZERO, WOT it is ~100. This is exactly my point, if you go WOT in order to take advantage of your power, the sled should jump to near max rpm, it NEVER pulls WOT from 6000. The ONLY time the engine is generating the HP on the graph is at WOT. Just can't be done given the way the clutching works.
 

ullose272

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Aug 18, 2009
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try looking at it from a different perspective. at it each rpm interval the engine is going to make a particular amount of horsepower, this is irrelevant of throttle position. for example, at say 6000 rpm, it is always going to be putting out the same amount of horsepower, whether the rpm's are going up (wide open throttle), going down (letting off throttle), or steady state (cruising or side-hilling). there are obvious exceptions to this when the fuel mixture, air density, or other input factors change. however, 6000 rpm will always be the same when the inputs are the same.

If a person is attempting to side-hill, they are not going wide open, they aren't going to be burping it either, they'll likely be running 6000-7000 rpm steady state feathering it as needed. In those instances, the more HP you have at the lower rpm, the easier the sled is going to be to control.
Ya this is very wrong, 6000rpm at 50% throttle does not make the same horsepower as 6000rpm at 100% throttle

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Type Z

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Dec 20, 2018
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As said before if they werent important they would not be there...Arguing about that is plain stupid and why people makin power remove them is because they spend most of their time at wot....If you think you are ...well you are funny...or trail riding to the bar :)....
 

Motorbreath_

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I honestly thought you would be able to come up with a decent argument for your contentions... As simple as it is though, I am amazed you want to be on the wrong side of it.
Although very difficult, I try to not spend my time arguing with people on the internet... It has taken up way too much of my time, with absolutely no benefit.
 

jakey-boy

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False premise ruins this argument. At 6000 rpm the power IS NOT the same regardless of throttle position. The ONLY time it is making the power on the dyno graph is at WOT. 6000 rpm is NOT always the same HP, closed throttle it is ZERO, WOT it is ~100. This is exactly my point, if you go WOT in order to take advantage of your power, the sled should jump to near max rpm, it NEVER pulls WOT from 6000. The ONLY time the engine is generating the HP on the graph is at WOT. Just can't be done given the way the clutching works.
Really going to regret even commenting on this thread since it has been derailed but I just want to throw a question out. It seems your argument is that the number on the dyno curve is not indicative of typical riding conditions because full throttle at 6k rpm never occurs. I guess what most of us are probably assuming though is that if it makes more power through that RPM range at full throttle won't it also make more power through that range through all throttle positions? No it will not necessarily match up to the numbers on the dyno chart but it should still be noticeable riding. Just my 2 cents I don't claim to be an expert but seems to me mid range gains still matter in the field.

Thanks to BMP for sharing the video and the dyno information without us paying for a subscription. We defnitely appreciate it.
 

sno*jet

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Reed pedals just get in the way at WOT, take those out too. not needed the way the clutches work. clutches all react exactly the same when you go WOT. doesn't matter if you've put heavier weights, steeper helix or anything.... they react in a nano second and you're at full power. and thats all that matters...
 

kanedog

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Big 10inch your getting internet slaughtered here. You better get in on this and defend.
 

kanedog

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Hey now, go easy on the Dad bods. I see some similarities between his shape and mine.
 

tenacious84

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False premise ruins this argument. At 6000 rpm the power IS NOT the same regardless of throttle position. The ONLY time it is making the power on the dyno graph is at WOT. 6000 rpm is NOT always the same HP, closed throttle it is ZERO, WOT it is ~100. This is exactly my point, if you go WOT in order to take advantage of your power, the sled should jump to near max rpm, it NEVER pulls WOT from 6000. The ONLY time the engine is generating the HP on the graph is at WOT. Just can't be done given the way the clutching works.
reading my last post again, i must have been drunk the night i wrote that response. obviously throttle position is going to change the amount of air/fuel going into the engine and thus change the amount of hp being produced at a given rpm.
 

Big10inch

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As said before if they werent important they would not be there...Arguing about that is plain stupid and why people makin power remove them is because they spend most of their time at wot....If you think you are ...well you are funny...or trail riding to the bar :)....
Damn dude, try to keep up. Nobody has been talking power valves in here for over a week. Wasn't even an argument I was interested in, or started...
 

Big10inch

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Big 10inch your getting internet slaughtered here. You better get in on this and defend.
How do you figure, not a single coherent rebuttal... I get that it feels good to talk about more midrange power, even though there is no way to access it on a sled. It must be better though right?
 

Big10inch

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Really going to regret even commenting on this thread since it has been derailed but I just want to throw a question out. It seems your argument is that the number on the dyno curve is not indicative of typical riding conditions because full throttle at 6k rpm never occurs. I guess what most of us are probably assuming though is that if it makes more power through that RPM range at full throttle won't it also make more power through that range through all throttle positions? No it will not necessarily match up to the numbers on the dyno chart but it should still be noticeable riding. Just my 2 cents I don't claim to be an expert but seems to me mid range gains still matter in the field.

Thanks to BMP for sharing the video and the dyno information without us paying for a subscription. We defnitely appreciate it.

So yes, you should be able to feel a part throttle improvement. So how much more throttle on a sled with less midrange does it take to match that improved power? Pretty soon you are WOT and again, midrange is moot. So your improved midrange at part throttle is easy to match with an older sled by just cracking the throttle another 1/8 inch. You guys must really be dialed in to feel that...
 

kanedog

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Freeride6500

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So yes, you should be able to feel a part throttle improvement. So how much more throttle on a sled with less midrange does it take to match that improved power? Pretty soon you are WOT and again, midrange is moot. So your improved midrange at part throttle is easy to match with an older sled by just cracking the throttle another 1/8 inch. You guys must really be dialed in to feel that...
You win! You win the dumbest person on the internet award. I really hope you ride with mechanically inclined sledders because you don’t know jack **** about anything. You remind me of some guys that I dirtbike with. They can’t understand why my 300cc two stroke smokes their shitty 450 four cycles. 450 is bigger than 300 therefore it’s better...........not. LOL!
 
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