• I've received emails and PM's asking me about "Group Buys" and promotions.

    A Group Buy here on SnoWestOnline.com would be a situation where a normal member (non vendor or mfg) personally collects orders from other members. That member then uses those orders to negotiate a better price with the Vendor/Mfg for HIS/HER "Group" of buyers.

    Here is an example of a viable "Group Buy"

    http://www.snowestonline.com/forum/showthread.php?t=269222

    A promotion that has the words "Group Buy" in the title is still a promotion, and from the rules that were handed down to me by Harris Publications is that non-advertisers cannot run promotions or open sales programs on the forums outside of the swapmeet.

    If a members wants to become a group buy manager, maintain a thread and collect the funds and negotiate a group buy... as a member, you are welcome to do that as long as you are not attached to the business of the vendor or Mfg.

    If you are a vendor/MFG and you want to offer an EXCLUSIVE "SnoWestOnline ONLY" promotion that is exclusive to snowest readers, please contact me and you'll be able to put it up in the Polaris forums.

    Also, before any vendors/mfgs get all "riled up" over this know that the moderators are strictly volunteers and do not receive a dime from any advertising $$ spent on this site.

    As ALWAYS, since DAY ONE of me becoming a moderator, I have pioneered, supported and encouraged vendors and mfgs in getting the word out to our readers with "New Product Announcements.

    Have a great season.

    From this point on, all vendors/mfg's promoting Pre-Season tiered sales programs, in the Polaris Forums, that are not paid advertisers will be appropriately moved to the swapmeet section of the forums.

    MH

Getting WORKED by the Khaos after switching from Doo

Nov 20, 2020
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I'm getting stomped left and right by this sled. On my Doo I could carve a nice turn and jump cliffs and climb pretty good. On the Khaos I am getting my a$$ handed to me all the time. My last Doo was an XP and I felt like it was always trying to get back on two skis, and I wished it felt like this sled. Now that I have it I can't even carve nice turns DOWNHILL in plower pow. And climbing I'm wheeling all over the place. I'm an absolute beginner on this sled. I can't even turn it around properly in the flats. I'm guessing the responsiveness is something I will love when I get used to it (I'm 9 hours in), but for now my whole scene is F'd. Not sure what kind of suggestions anyone might have for me but thought I would outline my experience for future converts. Don't get me wrong, I'll figure this out, I'm the kind of rider who sessions the same sidehill 10x to figure it out. But it has been way harder to adapt than I expected.

(Oops "getting worked by the Khaos" not "getting working". I can't figure out how to change the title or delete the thread) But if someone could suggest how to "getting it working" that would be great :)
 
Last edited:

shattuck

Well-known member
Premium Member
Dec 16, 2011
350
216
43
Eastern Washingtom
Down hill pow carves if that’s what you are referring to are much much better on a ski Doo even profession riders look stupid trying to do them on a Polaris.
Cliff drops or big drops are also better on a ski Doo that is another strength they have over Polaris
im not bashing Polaris I rode a skid Doo for two years and am back on Polaris now they are both excellent sleds just good at different things.
 
Nov 20, 2020
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Down hill pow carves if that’s what you are referring to are much much better on a ski Doo even profession riders look stupid trying to do them on a Polaris.
Cliff drops or big drops are also better on a ski Doo that is another strength they have over Polaris
im not bashing Polaris I rode a skid Doo for two years and am back on Polaris now they are both excellent sleds just good at different things.

Man I hope not, downhill pow carves and cliffs are what I’m in it for.


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ENDO1

Well-known member
Premium Member
Apr 6, 2008
507
62
28
Central WA State
I'm getting stomped left and right by this sled. On my Doo I could carve a nice turn and jump cliffs and climb pretty good. On the Khaos I am getting my a$$ handed to me all the time. My last Doo was an XP and I felt like it was always trying to get back on two skis, and I wished it felt like this sled. Now that I have it I can't even carve nice turns DOWNHILL in plower pow. And climbing I'm wheeling all over the place. I'm an absolute beginner on this sled. I can't even turn it around properly in the flats. I'm guessing the responsiveness is something I will love when I get used to it (I'm 9 hours in), but for now my whole scene is F'd. Not sure what kind of suggestions anyone might have for me but thought I would outline my experience for future converts. Don't get me wrong, I'll figure this out, I'm the kind of rider who sessions the same sidehill 10x to figure it out. But it has been way harder to adapt than I expected.

(Oops "getting worked by the Khaos" not "getting working". I can't figure out how to change the title or delete the thread) But if someone could suggest how to "getting it working" that would be great :)
Is yours a 155? I had a 155 Khaos last year and it handed my A$$ to me and then bent me over and gave me a good kick, LOL ! I now have a 2021 163 Khaos , A big difference, I love the sled, I think there might be a difference in the springs or something, definitely not just the 163 length. It seems to split the difference between a PRO and the Khaos 155.
 

Mort2112

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 30, 2010
248
154
43
Meridian, ID
Rode my buddy's Khaos the other day. I ride a G4. I felt like in order to get the Khaos to move, I had to overwork it compared to what I'm used to. Once it's up on edge though, it just sticks there. I loved how snappy the Khaos is and how easy it pops up on the snow, however, for me it took more body english to initiate any carving and ride. After I bit I over rode it less and used the throttle more which solved part of the problem. I'll take my Doo any day as for me, it's so much more suited to my riding style. That Khaos was an awesome ride though.
 
Dec 28, 2009
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Doesn't look like this was mentioned but its important to note you went from a horizontal (over the motor) steering post to a vertical steering post. This might sound like a mute change but it greatly affects your body position on the sled.

I came from a skidoo to an axys, but the 146 SKS with a horizontal post. I was right at home instantly. After 3 years on the SKS axys I tried my buddy's RMK, couldn't even ride it.
 

FatDogX

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 27, 2008
3,195
1,468
113
ND
Two suggestions out of the gate, play with those shock settings and keep track, also play with your foot placement.
 

Wheel House Motorsports

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 27, 2007
29,722
5,429
113
31
SW MT
Like anything, training your body how to input weight and throttle is huge. I learned to ride and spent years on REV/XP/XM sleds and now have 4 seasons on the Axys chassis andcurrently a Khaos. Like mentioned above, the steering geometry is one of the biggest things. How your pushing/ pulling on the bars is completely different and can be exhausting when doing it wrong.

In simple open terrain IMO the G4 and its sort of auto steering skis / steering maker for an easier ride but the second the riding gets technical that feature bits you real hard.

I can assure you the Axys will do anything you want with ease, just have to learn how to ask. Put a few days on it, start simple and just go through the motions and relearn, dont force yourself into tech spots and riding tight and nervous. You wont relearn the chassis this way and you will find yourself getting mad at it.
 

Solby

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
704
214
43
Colfax, WA
Time on your sled and learning how to use less strength and more technique, finesse, and throttle control will help. Took me hundreds of miles to feel good when I switched to Polaris and that was on the pro which is a lot less responsive than a Khaos. Experimenting with your FTS by tensioning and loosening should help you get used to different feels and hopefully one you like better. Downhill powder turns from my experience aren't the strength of the Polaris sleds. After some seat time I can now switch between my dad's G4 and my 850 pretty easily but they do ride a lot differently.
 

cortez

Well-known member
Feb 12, 2009
466
185
43
Two suggestions out of the gate, play with those shock settings and keep track, also play with your foot placement.

X2 on this one, I couldn’t believe the difference foot placement made on the axys chassis coming from skidoo.. move your wrong foot slightly forward in steep side hills and the sled just sticks on edge with zero effort. It’s different inputs on this chassis but overall a lot less muscling the sled around once you find the technique. I disagree with what others have said about downhill turns, axys cuts in like a knife on downhill turns, just gotta get your weight a bit more forward.


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Sheetmetalfab

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 5, 2010
6,333
4,001
113
Ak
X2 on this one, I couldn’t believe the difference foot placement made on the axys chassis coming from skidoo.. move your wrong foot slightly forward in steep side hills and the sled just sticks on edge with zero effort. It’s different inputs on this chassis but overall a lot less muscling the sled around once you find the technique. I disagree with what others have said about downhill turns, axys cuts in like a knife on downhill turns, just gotta get your weight a bit more forward.


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Yep the G4 is nose heavy to begin with.

Lift your toes in the footwells and carve.
 
Nov 20, 2020
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Thanks for all the replies!!

I went out today and just tried everything I could with body and foot positions super exaggerated, and stiff dampening to no dampening and somewhere along the line it clicked and I effin love my sled. For anyone reading this who might struggle in the transition between brands I basically tried the extremes for everything and tried to ride... uphill/flat/downhill with heels hanging off the back of the boards in a push up, then all over again up in the footwells pretty much folded over the bars. Then one foot forward one back etc just trying every position no matter how silly. When I got it I got it and felt unstoppable, finally hitting little stunts and making decent turns. In general the biggest thing I noticed was that I was riding with my feet too far forward in most situations.

I also noticed, like Wheel House pointed out, that I was used to a sort of auto-steer to catch me in a turn, and without it I was struggling. Foot placement makes a WAY bigger difference on the Polaris IMO. By the end of the day the only thing I was thinking about was what a fun winter it's going to be 🤟😁🤟
 
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