Gen4 skid weight

Teth-Air

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Is it too much to ask BRP to shave 10% off that weight and retain or increase reliability? These rails are the weakest design near the back compared to the competition as they don't get taller near the rear scissor. I have seen them bend on gentle creek crossings. The brace just in front of the scissor is a good idea. Although I ride Polaris I am pushing for all brands to be their best and am not bashing here.
 
Oct 9, 2009
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10% is easy...5 pounds. Remove the idler wheels from the center of the skid. And throw a billet rear arm on it to discard the weight of steel. Not much there in the rails. More rail strength will require more material, or better aluminum, which weighs a bit more.
 

Teth-Air

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10% is easy...5 pounds. Remove the idler wheels from the center of the skid. And throw a billet rear arm on it to discard the weight of steel. Not much there in the rails. More rail strength will require more material, or better aluminum, which weighs a bit more.
Have you looked at the Cat or Polaris rails? They have no more material but get much taller in the stress areas near the rear scissor. I bet those rails are even lighter than the Doo too?
 

Coldfinger

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Interesting. My 2010 162” M8 skid weighs 44# as weighed on my digital bathroom scale. should be within a few pounds. Fox Float rear shock and coil over front.
 
Oct 9, 2009
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Have you looked at the Cat or Polaris rails? They have no more material but get much taller in the stress areas near the rear scissor. I bet those rails are even lighter than the Doo too?
There is no sense in guessing. Weigh them. There are enough people on here to get that done. There are many dynamics to that you are leaving out...type of aluminum, ductility of the material, crossectional design, sled and rider weight distribution, etc. The design must consider moment arm load, lateral torsional buckling, shear, etc. These considerations are for obtaining optimal design, which depends on the rider and sled in motion. Given a fixed cross section, design matters. But, moving material vertically has to come from somewhere, otherwise the rail will be susceptible to lateral torsional buckling. This can be addressed with cross bars, but that comes at a cost of reduced cleaning action in the skid.

Then there is weight. Have you ever pulled a rail off? They don't weigh much to begin with. Yes, they could pull some weight out of a skid, but it the reality is it won't really affect the handling of the sled that much when trading off warranty claims. To really drop weight, the manufacturer needs to remove steel from the skid, and that is there by design choice with the torsional setup, which Doo thinks is an advantage for them. In the end, doo is not incentived to change. They sell more sleds than anyone with their skid. They are more concerned about fixing your sled when you break it under warranty.

As far as rails, here is a reason iceage makes money selling bomber rails.
 
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