First Snow Bike Help

Aug 12, 2021
4
1
3
Bozeman MT
Hye I'm new to the forums and new to sleds/snowbikes, but not new to dirtbikes or snow as I grew up racing moto and skis. I have a few questions for someone with some knowledge on timbersleds:
I'm about to pickup a used 2016 mountain horse 137 kit that already has the fit kit for my 2018 ktm 450sxf and the TSS shock. Is this a good first kit or is there any serious reason to avoid buying it?
Is there anything I should be looking for specifically on the kit (missing parts, damage, wear...) before buying it? Any questions I should ask the owner?
Thanks!!!
 

dooman92

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Should be a good setup with decent deep snow abilities. I had a 2016 120 timbersled and the only major issue I remember was the JT chains were junk. It will not be quite as manuverable as a shorter track but probably better in the deep. If the bearings in the kit have not been changed they could be suspect. Good Luck.
 

Robster

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Dec 2, 2007
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Sweden
Unless you ride in deep pow or are a big guy 250lbs or more I would go with a 120 inch kit 100%. A long track kit is less agile and feels like riding a long bed pickup compared to a BMW M3 which represents a short track kit.
It all depends on what you like and how you plan to ride. Agressive treeriding never ever a 137 kit , unless you need it due to size is my experience.

Rob
 

jrlastofthebreed

It seemed like a good idea at the time
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Oct 24, 2016
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As mentioned above the long track is really only good if your heavy, just want to put or are a hill climber on a 150 hp bike. 2016's chains are junk. the rail bumper screws get loose and back out causing the rails to crack and break. Keep an eye on them (loctite works). Pop the chain cover off and loosen the drive chain. grab the sprockets and spin the upper and push them up and down and check for play, smooth bearings. They go bad eventually. Also the splined shaft (the upper one) wheres out when the bearings go. Only other thing to look at is the forward A arm. the lower shaft has these little plastic spacers that slide in and out and are held in with set screws. Those should be all the way in all the time. It they arn't that cross shaft will snap.
 
Mar 9, 2017
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stillwater MN
I owned a 16 timbersled 137 for 2 years and had a blast! Drill out the bumper bolts on the slide rails to 1/4 and put some 1/4 grade 5 bolts in with lock nuts and flat washers. Chain adjuster is plastic gear so bring a spare, if it gets loose you will take out the teeth, chains have probable all ready been swapped but I put new ones on every year, good idea to get new sprockets also if needed, pump that tss up to 400 and adjust strut rod so your track is perfectly level to ground, do your normal check of suspension parts and grease it up, pretty good kit and never left me stranded. 137 push’s a little in trees compared to short track but nothing to get to concerned about or ruin your day, you will go everywhere the 120s go and if it’s deep you will do better than them. I know from experience. Dont think swapping the ski from MH to newer traverse or anything else will help the 137 turn better because it won’t, they just tend to have a little delay compared to 129 or 120. It’s not that bad as some may lead you to believe. Experience on 2 wheels you have so within a day or 2 you will go everywhere everyone else goes. 137 is great starter kit for new. You will probable settle in the 129 length once you figure it all out as it’s best of both worlds really. I run a 126 track (125.8 2.6 lug rocks) and turns on a dime but goes everywhere the 137 do but much better in deep than 120. I drilled out the suspension holes on 16 MH and raised my skid up in the tunnel 3/4 of a inch, helped it get on top of snow a little better but that’s probable a different post all together. Have fun with it. BTW everything I said I am assuming you will be riding out west off trail as your goal.
 

G-Force

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Thanks for all your help, now I gotta figure out the whole airbox situation.
I have the same '18 KTM 450SX-F as you. For the air box, I just bought a spare cover, and ventilated it like the new stock covers are. I then covered both outside, and inside, with SLP material, then used an outerwear filter cover for the air filter. Then went one step further, added another filter with cover to "stuff" the air box, effectively giving snow no space to accumulate in the air box.
Might not be the ultimate solution, but worked well for me in many rides of fluffy dry powder.
 
Aug 12, 2021
4
1
3
Bozeman MT
Well it turns out the guy I bought it from kind of scammed me a bit- ended up having to buy a new fit kit to replace one cracked bushing. Also didn't come with the spacers that go on the front axel between the spindle and forks. Bike is still in pieces and I getting really worried I may have sunk $2800 into something that's gonna leave me stranded on a mountain in the winter, or destroy my ktm.
 
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