• I've received emails and PM's asking me about "Group Buys" and promotions.

    A Group Buy here on SnoWestOnline.com would be a situation where a normal member (non vendor or mfg) personally collects orders from other members. That member then uses those orders to negotiate a better price with the Vendor/Mfg for HIS/HER "Group" of buyers.

    Here is an example of a viable "Group Buy"

    http://www.snowestonline.com/forum/showthread.php?t=269222

    A promotion that has the words "Group Buy" in the title is still a promotion, and from the rules that were handed down to me by Harris Publications is that non-advertisers cannot run promotions or open sales programs on the forums outside of the swapmeet.

    If a members wants to become a group buy manager, maintain a thread and collect the funds and negotiate a group buy... as a member, you are welcome to do that as long as you are not attached to the business of the vendor or Mfg.

    If you are a vendor/MFG and you want to offer an EXCLUSIVE "SnoWestOnline ONLY" promotion that is exclusive to snowest readers, please contact me and you'll be able to put it up in the Polaris forums.

    Also, before any vendors/mfgs get all "riled up" over this know that the moderators are strictly volunteers and do not receive a dime from any advertising $$ spent on this site.

    As ALWAYS, since DAY ONE of me becoming a moderator, I have pioneered, supported and encouraged vendors and mfgs in getting the word out to our readers with "New Product Announcements.

    Have a great season.

    From this point on, all vendors/mfg's promoting Pre-Season tiered sales programs, in the Polaris Forums, that are not paid advertisers will be appropriately moved to the swapmeet section of the forums.

    MH

Beginner Sled Advice: Pro versus Axys

akmotorider

Member
Oct 14, 2019
5
9
3
Alright guys, newbie here. I'm a 24-year-old who has been on a snowmachine only once before. I live in Alaska, where most of the riding is in the mountains. I've found great deals on Pro RMK's in the classifieds, but I am aware that Polaris has recently introduced the AXYS. I have $5000 cash to spend without taking out a loan. I am considering two machines: a 2013 Polaris RMK Pro 800 155" with 1500 miles for $4500 or a 2016 Polaris Axys 800 155" with 160 miles (brand new, the guy is moving very soon) for $7000. Long story short, I was approved for a loan through a local credit union at 4.1% APR for $2000 to cover the price of the AXYS. I can also buy the Pro outright without taking out a loan, and have enough left over for a small trailer.. which I will need.

I'm extremely conflicted about this. A veteran of the sport and dear friend of mine tells me that taking out a loan on a machine is a terrible idea, and that I should go with the Pro, because as a beginner I won't notice the difference anyway. Yet in these forums, all I see is boundless praise for the AXYS chassis. I have barely any experience on a sled to begin with, so right now, I can't visualize the difference. But with no experience, I'd imagine that learning on newer technology would be a much better idea than riding the Pro for a year and then trying to adapt to the AXYS.

If you were in my position, what would you do? Take out a $2000 loan at 4.1% APR to afford this great deal on an AXYS, or just cut your losses and buy the Pro as your very first sled?
 

akmotorider

Member
Oct 14, 2019
5
9
3
I cannot edit this post, but it is also worth mentioning that I am in stable employment. I'm really just trying to see if an AXYS is worth $2500 more, which I realize is a highly subjective opinion. But that's fine; at this point, I just need more opinions, period.
 

polaris bob

Well-known member
Premium Member
Aug 16, 2002
120
46
28
57
Michigan
I've been riding for a long time and I just upgraded to a 2013 assault switchback which is a pro ride 800.

I'm coming off a 2000 700 XC SP that I had since new and modified over the years.

My riding buddy has a brand new last year 2019 axys switchback assault.

Are there diffeences? Of course there are.
Are the differences worth $2000 plus plus 4.1 interest plus plus the cost of a trailer?

Only you can determine that in your heart and in your gut.
If you were my buddy and I was helping you buy your first sled I would probably suggest you buy the pro ride.

As you said, because this is your first sled you're not going to notice any difference and it's still a fantastic sled.

Take the extra money and use it to buy whatever accessories you need for yourself or for making a sled your own and buy your trailer and just enjoy it.
 

summ8rmk

Too handsome
Lifetime Membership
Premium Member
Feb 16, 2008
10,892
4,314
113
yakima, wa.
I recomend the '13 and trailer.
Its a fine sled. Take that money u were gonna spend on payments and put back into a savings account and u can put that towards a newer sled next year if u choose.

Sent it
 

jcrjet

Well-known member
Jan 20, 2009
299
51
28
Northern Utah
I'd go with the pro as well. At your skill level, you won't be able to utilize the difference. By the time you acquire the skills (couple riding seasons) both sled will be worthless and you will be money ahead for your next one.
 

Meadow Muffin

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Jan 3, 2012
238
114
43
SE Iowa
I agree with everyone also, the latest and greatest is always awesome but the Pro is a great chassis and financing toys is never a great idea.
 

akmotorider

Member
Oct 14, 2019
5
9
3
Thanks everyone, I went with the Pro. I appreciate your input, it helped me make my decision. I'm looking forward to riding it this winter. Time to join the Slednecks!
 

Elkaholic4life

Twin Peaks
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Premium Member
Dec 19, 2013
7,226
4,794
113
50
Portland, OR
I would like to strongly suggest reading up on avalanche danger and the safety equipment that goes with it. Have fun and be safe out there.

I started on a 2013 pro. Still have it, My nieces ride it now. I switched to a 2018 axys. Both are great sleds
 

AkRider217

New member
Feb 12, 2017
34
3
8
Seward, Alaska
I always think it's better to start out on the older sled. I rode for years on a 2003 RMK 800. Just last year I upgraded to a 2013 Pro RMK 800 and can appreciate the excellent handling so much more knowing how much better it is than the older snowmachines. Start out on an older sled, then when you get a new one you'll like it even more!

P.S. Great to have another fellow Alaska Rider on here and out on the snow!
 

BeartoothBaron

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 2, 2017
354
219
43
Roberts, MT
I agree with the consensus, but would have actually suggested even less. I think with $5k to spend, you should be looking to spend $3k on the sled, at most. You may love the sport and be logging hundreds of miles every weekend right off the bat (in that scenario, the AXYS may actually be worth it in the long run), but you may lose interest or just not end up riding that much. In the worst case, you could easily lose a couple grand unloading the sled. Then there's the possibility of an expensive repair, or that you ball the sled up. It's not that a new rider won't appreciate a newer sled, just that your level of commitment and what sled meets your needs become a lot more clear after a season or two.

Anyway, getting back to how much to spend, the thing people don't think about when they're just starting (I didn't, anyway) is all that gear that's borderline essential or just makes sledding more comfortable and accessible. There's the safety stuff, like an avalanche beacon, probe, and shovel that'll be $300-500. Then you'll want some riding gear: helmet, goggles, gloves – at least another $500 there (likely closer to $1000 if you want good stuff). Then there's the "nice to have" stuff: backpack, radio, GPS. Just like the sled, you'll probably upgrade a lot of this stuff, but be careful of overlooking anything (especially safety-related). Guarantee you'd have more fun on a hooptie sled if you're warm and dry than if you're freezing your butt off, even on a tricked out 850.
 

User Name

Active member
Jul 20, 2016
133
30
28
29
Montana
Here's some comments going against what everyone else is saying, just for some perspective. Neither choice is ultimately right or wrong. The new AXYS is easier to ride than a Pro. I'd say s ski Doo gen 4 is the easiest to ride for a new rider while an axys is more suited to a more advanced rider. But in both cases, the new generation is easier to ride than the previous.

Other thing to consider is what the 2 sleds be worth when you sell them? Will there be a new generation by the time you sell that sled? If so, I'd bet the AXYS takes less of a depreciation hit.

How long of is the loan? Seems like you can afford it and it's a quick and easy way to build up some credit. You can always pay it off early and pay less interest (assuming there isn't an early repayment fee).

What I personally would do is buy the Pro and ride it for the winter. When the spring hits, trade your sled in for a new one. Dealers want to move sleds in the spring and offer 0% interest loans. It's kinda crazy. So firstly look at trade in value for the Pro and see what the 1 year older model would be offered and ballpark that as your trade in. Say you save a little cash and you have a $5k down payment with trade in. Hopefully you can find a previous year sled for maybe $11k or so (not sure on AK pricing) and spread that over a 5 year 0% interest loan and it comes out to $100 a month plus sales tax which oh by the way is based on $6k rather than $11k so is almost half.

Wow I should work for a dealer.
 

akmotorider

Member
Oct 14, 2019
5
9
3
I agree with the consensus, but would have actually suggested even less. I think with $5k to spend, you should be looking to spend $3k on the sled, at most. You may love the sport and be logging hundreds of miles every weekend right off the bat (in that scenario, the AXYS may actually be worth it in the long run), but you may lose interest or just not end up riding that much. In the worst case, you could easily lose a couple grand unloading the sled. Then there's the possibility of an expensive repair, or that you ball the sled up. It's not that a new rider won't appreciate a newer sled, just that your level of commitment and what sled meets your needs become a lot more clear after a season or two.

Anyway, getting back to how much to spend, the thing people don't think about when they're just starting (I didn't, anyway) is all that gear that's borderline essential or just makes sledding more comfortable and accessible. There's the safety stuff, like an avalanche beacon, probe, and shovel that'll be $300-500. Then you'll want some riding gear: helmet, goggles, gloves – at least another $500 there (likely closer to $1000 if you want good stuff). Then there's the "nice to have" stuff: backpack, radio, GPS. Just like the sled, you'll probably upgrade a lot of this stuff, but be careful of overlooking anything (especially safety-related). Guarantee you'd have more fun on a hooptie sled if you're warm and dry than if you're freezing your butt off, even on a tricked out 850.
If only I had read your comment three weeks ago..

I ended up buying the Pro. I had $500 cash left afterwards, but eventually spent close to $2000 more. You were right on point. I got great deals on all my equipment, and it still cost me an arm and a leg. What was initially a meager prospect has turned into a full-scale investment. Who knew all the other crap was so expensive?
 

akmotorider

Member
Oct 14, 2019
5
9
3
Oh, and thank you all for your contributions. It is much appreciated. Elkaholic, I took your suggestion and researched avalanche safety. It is a much more complicated topic than I realized. I am going to take an avalanche safety course as soon as I can.
 

polaris bob

Well-known member
Premium Member
Aug 16, 2002
120
46
28
57
Michigan
If only I had read your comment three weeks ago..

I ended up buying the Pro. I had $500 cash left afterwards, but eventually spent close to $2000 more. You were right on point. I got great deals on all my equipment, and it still cost me an arm and a leg. What was initially a meager prospect has turned into a full-scale investment. Who knew all the other crap was so expensive?
Oh, and thank you all for your contributions. It is much appreciated. Elkaholic, I took your suggestion and researched avalanche safety. It is a much more complicated topic than I realized. I am going to take an avalanche safety course as soon as I can.
Glad you found something that will work for you!!

As I said in my post above that was one of the reasons why I recommended you go at the less expensive sled so what you would have some money left over to buy the necessary equipment and accessories you're going to want and need.

If you ride and play in avalanche areas most definitely take a avalanche course and buy the necessary equipment to protect yourself and your buddies lives while riding.
Safety always comes first!!!

As they say live to ride another day.
 
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