• I've received emails and PM's asking me about "Group Buys" and promotions.

    A Group Buy here on SnoWestOnline.com would be a situation where a normal member (non vendor or mfg) personally collects orders from other members. That member then uses those orders to negotiate a better price with the Vendor/Mfg for HIS/HER "Group" of buyers.

    Here is an example of a viable "Group Buy"

    http://www.snowestonline.com/forum/showthread.php?t=269222

    A promotion that has the words "Group Buy" in the title is still a promotion, and from the rules that were handed down to me by Harris Publications is that non-advertisers cannot run promotions or open sales programs on the forums outside of the swapmeet.

    If a members wants to become a group buy manager, maintain a thread and collect the funds and negotiate a group buy... as a member, you are welcome to do that as long as you are not attached to the business of the vendor or Mfg.

    If you are a vendor/MFG and you want to offer an EXCLUSIVE "SnoWestOnline ONLY" promotion that is exclusive to snowest readers, please contact me and you'll be able to put it up in the Polaris forums.

    Also, before any vendors/mfgs get all "riled up" over this know that the moderators are strictly volunteers and do not receive a dime from any advertising $$ spent on this site.

    As ALWAYS, since DAY ONE of me becoming a moderator, I have pioneered, supported and encouraged vendors and mfgs in getting the word out to our readers with "New Product Announcements.

    Have a great season.

    From this point on, all vendors/mfg's promoting Pre-Season tiered sales programs, in the Polaris Forums, that are not paid advertisers will be appropriately moved to the swapmeet section of the forums.

    MH

850 Compression numbers

kanedog

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What are your compression numbers?
 

Snopro_69

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If talking psi per cylinder, not compression ratio. I'm at 125 psi on each at 2100FT on my 2020. Brand spanking, barely has idled yet even.

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Indy_500

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And remember. Gauges vary!!! Both the Polaris 800s I’ve owned haven’t been over 115 psi, which is right where all the 600s I’ve owned have been with this gauge also. I wouldn’t be so concerned about the number as I would be that they are the same. Compression doesn’t tell the entire story though. Piston in the pic still had 115 psi (same as other side) on my 16 800ho and ran ok. Last year I also seized up an 04 pro x 600 (my trail burner for at home) I let it cool down broke it free and ran it 50 miles back to the truck. Nikasil was torn off in multiple spots of the cylinder and piston was mangled. Still had 115 psi.

CF2012F4-6F24-431F-A7F3-5A0370486163.jpeg
 

Snopro_69

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Put compression tester in. Unplug other spark plug. Hold wide open and pull hard 5 times. That's how I do it.

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Big10inch

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As discussed a hundred times on this forum, compression testing is mostly worthless on a sled. You need to do leak down testing to find out how well it is sealing. Bad pistons and good numbers tell the truth, toss the compression tester, upgrade to a leak down tester. Much better way to monitor the health of your engine.
 

kanedog

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We are trying to establish a Polaris 850 compression baseline for comparison of sled to sled bigdum10inch. Come on now, pay attention. Chop chop
 

madmax

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Also not a bad idea to get a baseline compression on your personal sled and follow there compression numbers throughout the year.
 

Big10inch

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We are trying to establish a Polaris 850 compression baseline for comparison of sled to sled bigdum10inch. Come on now, pay attention. Chop chop
Yes and you have been here long enough to know that 1) you can not compare numbers from one tester to another, 2) from one elevation to another 3) one test procedure from another. Then to top it off somebody proves my point by showing a ruined piston that still showed good compression. How thick can you get?
 

Big10inch

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I guess it makes sense here in Polaris land. If you monitor compression, no matter how bad it runs, you can say it has good compression... LOL Polaris lives off of you guys, laughing all the way to the bank.
 

Teth-Air

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Yes and you have been here long enough to know that 1) you can not compare numbers from one tester to another, 2) from one elevation to another 3) one test procedure from another. Then to top it off somebody proves my point by showing a ruined piston that still showed good compression. How thick can you get?
Correct me if I am wrong but I believe elevation and barometric pressure should have nothing to do with the compression results on the gauge. You are measuring gauge pressure and not absolute pressure here. If there is less air pressure pushing into the cylinder at higher elevation, there is also less external pressure exerted on the Bourdon tube of the compression tester. They cancel each other out and it is a simple multiplier of volumes of air.
 
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