• I am getting worn out moving your "For sale" threads, including loosely veiled sales pitches for "How much is it worth) or Wanted to buy to the swapmeet.

    I will no longer be moving them for you as I have been in the past.

    Some days are 20 per day.

    If I see it, it will get deleted.

    I try to help you...please try to help me.

    Thanks.
  • I've received emails and PM's asking me about "Group Buys" and promotions.

    A Group Buy here on SnoWestOnline.com would be a situation where a normal member (non vendor or mfg) personally collects orders from other members. That member then uses those orders to negotiate a better price with the Vendor/Mfg for HIS/HER "Group" of buyers.

    Here is an example of a viable "Group Buy"

    http://www.snowestonline.com/forum/showthread.php?t=269222

    A promotion that has the words "Group Buy" in the title is still a promotion, and from the rules that were handed down to me by Harris Publications is that non-advertisers cannot run promotions or open sales programs on the forums outside of the swapmeet.

    If a members wants to become a group buy manager, maintain a thread and collect the funds and negotiate a group buy... as a member, you are welcome to do that as long as you are not attached to the business of the vendor or Mfg.

    If you are a vendor/MFG and you want to offer an EXCLUSIVE "SnoWestOnline ONLY" promotion that is exclusive to snowest readers, please contact me and you'll be able to put it up in the Polaris forums.

    Also, before any vendors/mfgs get all "riled up" over this know that the moderators are strictly volunteers and do not receive a dime from any advertising $$ spent on this site.

    As ALWAYS, since DAY ONE of me becoming a moderator, I have pioneered, supported and encouraged vendors and mfgs in getting the word out to our readers with "New Product Announcements.

    Have a great season.

    From this point on, all vendors/mfg's promoting Pre-Season tiered sales programs, in the Polaris Forums, that are not paid advertisers will be appropriately moved to the swapmeet section of the forums.

    MH

1992 Indy 500 EFI

Dec 15, 2017
7
0
1
Hello all. I am new to this forum and relatively new to old snowmobiles. I picked up a 1992 Indy 500 EFI last year and love it. I actually like it more than my 2015. Anyway, it needs some work. I have been told that a good place to start would be to check the chaincase to ensure it has been properly lubed. Pardon my lack of knowledge here, but I know (or I think) it is on the outside of the brake. Correct? I do not see any reservoir or way to check the fluid level. Can somebody please help? Maybe post a picture or something? I will try and post a picture of my engine....
 

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Lake Powell

Active member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 27, 2016
62
26
18
Silt, Colorado
I believe the 92 chaincase will have a small bolt inside a rubber nut assembly that you remove to check oil level. Best thing to do is remove the exhaust pipe and remove chain case cover to drain out old oil and clean out the crap at the bottom of the case. You can also check and adjust your chain tension at this time then reassemble and add your chaincase oil till it comes out the check hole.
 

Merlin

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 7, 2004
1,183
297
83
Medicine Hat, AB
Welcome to Snowest!

I'd recommend getting a service manual or an operator's manual at the very least as there are numerous maintenance items that will be covered. Things like lubrication points & intervals, track tension adjustment, drive belt inspection & deflection, etc.

You're on the right track in wanting to check the chain case oil & on a "new to you" machine the best thing to do is to remove the cover to properly drain and clean out the case as already suggested. Then you can inspect the chain, gears, & tensioner while it's open. Reassemble, adjust chain tension, & refill with oil.

All of that will be covered in the manuals.........


Hello all. I am new to this forum and relatively new to old snowmobiles. I picked up a 1992 Indy 500 EFI last year and love it. I actually like it more than my 2015. Anyway, it needs some work. I have been told that a good place to start would be to check the chaincase to ensure it has been properly lubed. Pardon my lack of knowledge here, but I know (or I think) it is on the outside of the brake. Correct? I do not see any reservoir or way to check the fluid level. Can somebody please help? Maybe post a picture or something? I will try and post a picture of my engine....
 

Bushwacker1

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 27, 2008
257
140
43
Wisconsin
I believe the 92 chaincase will have a small bolt inside a rubber nut assembly that you remove to check oil level. Best thing to do is remove the exhaust pipe and remove chain case cover to drain out old oil and clean out the crap at the bottom of the case. You can also check and adjust your chain tension at this time then reassemble and add your chaincase oil till it comes out the check hole.
Yes the chain case you have was not very user friendly and you need to pull the bolt mentioned above and then add oil till it comes out of the bolt hole. There was no drain plug on that case so draining required just pulling the cover and then cleaning up the mess. As mentioned If you pull the pipe off it is easier to access the cover. I have drilled and taped the case for a drain plug to make service easier. Just need to be careful about where you drill so it does not hit one of the case webs. Another option is to tip the sled on its side, remove the cover and then use a turkey baster to remove most of the oil so it is not so messy. If you find it is very low on oil you may want to look at the seal and the condition of the bottom bearing. It kind of puts a damper on a day of ridding when you need to drag a sled in with a failed bottom bearing. (I was not up on things like checking chain case oil back in 1992 and learned that lesson.)
 
Dec 15, 2017
7
0
1
Thank you. I have been searching for a manual, unsuccessful currently.
As for removing the cover and cleaning, is there a special cleaner that is best to use? Also, how about tension? I imagine it shouldn’t be too loose nor too tight.






QUOTE=Merlin;4111540]Welcome to Snowest!

I'd recommend getting a service manual or an operator's manual at the very least as there are numerous maintenance items that will be covered. Things like lubrication points & intervals, track tension adjustment, drive belt inspection & deflection, etc.

You're on the right track in wanting to check the chain case oil & on a "new to you" machine the best thing to do is to remove the cover to properly drain and clean out the case as already suggested. Then you can inspect the chain, gears, & tensioner while it's open. Reassemble, adjust chain tension, & refill with oil.

All of that will be covered in the manuals.........
[/QUOTE]
 

Merlin

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Oct 7, 2004
1,183
297
83
Medicine Hat, AB
Any garden variety brand of "Brake Clean" in an aerosol can will work well to rinse off the parts & to spray into the nooks and crannies in the case.

I'd suggest sesrching the 'net for the proper procedure however a rule of thumb that will usually work in a pinch is to tighten the adjusting bolt by hand / fingers until all slack is removed from the chain. Then loosen the adjuster a smidge, maybe a 1/4 to 1/3 of a turn, then lock the jam nut. The idea is to run the chain with as little slack as possible to prevent shock loading during rapid acceleration & deceleration yet not so tight to cause premature wear.

Hopefully someone will chime in with the information for this model as there are subtle differences in chain case design that affect the exact procedure used.


In the meantime don't stop looking for a manual until you have one.


Good luck!




Thank you. I have been searching for a manual, unsuccessful currently.
As for removing the cover and cleaning, is there a special cleaner that is best to use? Also, how about tension? I imagine it shouldn’t be too loose nor too tight?
 
Dec 15, 2017
7
0
1
Thank you. Looks like I got a weekend project :)



Any garden variety brand of "Brake Clean" in an aerosol can will work well to rinse off the parts & to spray into the nooks and crannies in the case.

I'd suggest sesrching the 'net for the proper procedure however a rule of thumb that will usually work in a pinch is to tighten the adjusting bolt by hand / fingers until all slack is removed from the chain. Then loosen the adjuster a smidge, maybe a 1/4 to 1/3 of a turn, then lock the jam nut. The idea is to run the chain with as little slack as possible to prevent shock loading during rapid acceleration & deceleration yet not so tight to cause premature wear.

Hopefully someone will chime in with the information for this model as there are subtle differences in chain case design that affect the exact procedure used.


In the meantime don't stop looking for a manual until you have one.


Good luck!


 
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