154 3" track owners: How did you fix it?

Jul 20, 2016
133
30
28
29
Montana
Feeling pretty confident that I messed up with the 154 3" track. Have other owners swapped out? Wondering if going to 2.6" or 165 is the more economical option or if anybody has found a market of 2.6 owners who want to trade.

Speaking of, I am in the SLC area and think I have 700 miles on the track, if anyone wants to trade
 

kcj1317

Well-known member
Premium Member
Sep 29, 2012
303
62
28
Edmonds Washington, St Charles Idaho
Feeling pretty confident that I messed up with the 154 3" track. Have other owners swapped out? Wondering if going to 2.6" or 165 is the more economical option or if anybody has found a market of 2.6 owners who want to trade.

Speaking of, I am in the SLC area and think I have 700 miles on the track, if anyone wants to trade
Why do you think you messed up? While my 14 has the 2.6, I think, and my 17 had a 165 with the 3" I always thought the 154 3 would be a hoot. I say this because I like each sled for different reasons. My 14 couldn't do near what the 17 could in deep snow for obvious reasons. My 154 is quicker, more for when the snow isn't as deep, and nimble. I would think 154X3 combo would ALMOST be the best of both worlds. Sure suffers in the deep vs the 165 but still nimble and a ton of fun. Just my .02.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

donbrown

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
6,326
840
113
57
Los Angeles
Go with longer track if you DONT like wheelies. 154 better in the trees. 154 spools up faster. 154 more nimble than 165 BUT not as good in the steep and deep. There are endless threads on 165 vs 154

 
Last edited:

donbrown

Well-known member
Lifetime Membership
Nov 26, 2007
6,326
840
113
57
Los Angeles
Go with longer track if you DONT like wheelies. 154 better in the trees. 154 spools up faster. 154 more nimble than 165 BUT not as good in the steep and deep. There are endless threads on 165 vs 154

For California the snow dumps pretty deep and access is difficult immediately after a storm … where I ride.


So gotta ride 2-5 days after a storm and a 154 makes it a blast. No many mile climbs around here but 1,000s of small meadows and endless trees.
 
Last edited:
Jul 20, 2016
133
30
28
29
Montana
Specifically what don't you like about it?
It just trenches like a MFer. I've moved the limiter strap but then you are limited in suspension and feel like I get knocked off a sidehill earlier.

Had a couple people relatively in the know tell me 154 with a 3" is a tough combo and I'm starting to believe them
 

MountainTrashCat

⚙️📆🌸
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 10, 2003
68,839
6,362
113
T5M 2Z3
www.mutualpropane.ab.ca
Top of the list would be to lower the bars. Lots. That’s an absolute must, gotta be able to move your weight forward when needed. Doing so allows you to set up the skid in a way that allows the suspension to work properly.

When set up properly and ridden aggressively they are so much fun!!!
 
Nov 11, 2010
480
214
43
32
Clearwater BC
Lower bars are a must on all mtn sleds imo but most disagree even though they are shorter than me. The doo adj riser is great because then you can raise the bars back up for rough trails and stand comfortably to save your back.

The whole point of a 154 3" is to have a light front end and be fun. I would let the limiter back out and look at adding an adj coupling block, ARC setup, or QSL shock so you can clamp the front end down for when you need it.
 

MountainTrashCat

⚙️📆🌸
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 10, 2003
68,839
6,362
113
T5M 2Z3
www.mutualpropane.ab.ca
Lower bars are a must on all mtn sleds imo but most disagree even though they are shorter than me. The doo adj riser is great because then you can raise the bars back up for rough trails and stand comfortably to save your back.

The whole point of a 154 3" is to have a light front end and be fun. I would let the limiter back out and look at adding an adj coupling block, ARC setup, or QSL shock so you can clamp the front end down for when you need it.
have you tried a QS-L shock?

I have been very interested and some real world feedback would be awesome...... :)

Could be a great add on for these wheelie monsters. Lol

Another thought, my previous sled had the Doo limiter strap quick adjustment kit, I usually just left it in the long position but it did make a substantial difference between the two settings ......
 
Nov 11, 2010
480
214
43
32
Clearwater BC
have you tried a QS-L shock?

I have been very interested and some real world feedback would be awesome...... :)

Could be a great add on for these wheelie monsters. Lol

Another thought, my previous sled had the Doo limiter strap quick adjustment kit, I usually just left it in the long position but it did make a substantial difference between the two settings ......
I have not tried one on a doo but did really like the ARC on my 163 3" XM. I've used the QSL on the Cat and it's great. On the fly handlebar control would be even better though.
 
Jul 20, 2016
133
30
28
29
Montana
Lower bars are a must on all mtn sleds imo but most disagree even though they are shorter than me. The doo adj riser is great because then you can raise the bars back up for rough trails and stand comfortably to save your back.

The whole point of a 154 3" is to have a light front end and be fun. I would let the limiter back out and look at adding an adj coupling block, ARC setup, or QSL shock so you can clamp the front end down for when you need it.
Yup have the lowest riser Doo offers. But I'm only 5' 9" so maybe I'm still too short. Was the first thing I tried. Helped a little but by no means to the point where I felt the handling was acceptable. I am picking up the new expert spindles in hopes it fixes it's sidehill issues. Couldn't keep that dang nose down on a sidehill no matter how forward I got and how much throttle/brake feathering I applied. Thought it was a symptom of a short 3" track but maybe that's more ski performance than anything. I picked up a 154 3" to have a nimble deep snow sled for tree riding but feel like a longer track would have helped the sled do what I want without having to fight it.

What else did you do to get your sled set up right and eliminate trenching? Kind of shocked how much fiddling I have to do on this sled to get it how I want. Maybe I am not as similar to the target customer as I'd thought.
 

NHRoadking

Well-known member
Premium Member
Apr 23, 2012
475
176
43
Yup have the lowest riser Doo offers. But I'm only 5' 9" so maybe I'm still too short. Was the first thing I tried. Helped a little but by no means to the point where I felt the handling was acceptable. I am picking up the new expert spindles in hopes it fixes it's sidehill issues. Couldn't keep that dang nose down on a sidehill no matter how forward I got and how much throttle/brake feathering I applied. Thought it was a symptom of a short 3" track but maybe that's more ski performance than anything. I picked up a 154 3" to have a nimble deep snow sled for tree riding but feel like a longer track would have helped the sled do what I want without having to fight it.

What else did you do to get your sled set up right and eliminate trenching? Kind of shocked how much fiddling I have to do on this sled to get it how I want. Maybe I am not as similar to the target customer as I'd thought.

To help with trenching try:

Tighten torsion springs in the back from the stock #1 setting to 3 or 4.

Put limiter strap in the #2 setting.

Set your front track shock spring to the loosest setting.

This worked for me.
 
Last edited:

MountainTrashCat

⚙️📆🌸
Staff member
Lifetime Membership
Dec 10, 2003
68,839
6,362
113
T5M 2Z3
www.mutualpropane.ab.ca
I agree with that^^^

And don’t be shy with the suspension changes, but I would suggest not changing too many things at once, and write down your settings. Do as much of it as possible out on the mountain, except maybe the limiter strap as that can leave you searching for nuts and bolts and washers in the snow.

If the Expert spindles do what they say they will then they may also be of interest.
 
Nov 11, 2010
480
214
43
32
Clearwater BC
Yup have the lowest riser Doo offers. But I'm only 5' 9" so maybe I'm still too short. Was the first thing I tried. Helped a little but by no means to the point where I felt the handling was acceptable. I am picking up the new expert spindles in hopes it fixes it's sidehill issues. Couldn't keep that dang nose down on a sidehill no matter how forward I got and how much throttle/brake feathering I applied. Thought it was a symptom of a short 3" track but maybe that's more ski performance than anything. I picked up a 154 3" to have a nimble deep snow sled for tree riding but feel like a longer track would have helped the sled do what I want without having to fight it.

What else did you do to get your sled set up right and eliminate trenching? Kind of shocked how much fiddling I have to do on this sled to get it how I want. Maybe I am not as similar to the target customer as I'd thought.
I'm 6'3" and use the Doo adjustable as low as it goes with a flat CFR bar. The Munster bushings are cheaper than the expert spindles and skis and help keep the ski flatter for sidehilling you can also shim the ski rubber to help hold the ski flat as well. Crank up the rear springs to max and consider getting the rear spring preload bushing. Other than that Doo's aren't great and sidehilling flat they have a tendency to wash out and want to go up hill. Rear suspension coupling and a longer track both help with this though. How is the clutching? If it's worn out or not setup properly it has a tendency to trench at take off in the trees.
 
Premium Features