1/2 ton, 2-3 sleds 1300 MI one way, how would you do it?

North Dakota 322

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The rundown....

In the past we have been using a friends 3/4 ton pickup with up to 5 people sleds and gear.
I am getting tired of trying to organise the large trips and want to storm chase a little more.
A Lot easier to get one more riled up last moment then 5 more.

I purchased a really low mile 17 chevy 1500 crew cab with a 5.5 box getting a set of 10 ply toyo at 3 tires. My needs as of now do not justify a 3/4 ton truck.
I currently have a 18' 4 (squeeze 5) place open trailer with 10" tires. We have taken it on quite a few trips west and haven't had a problem (not even a blown tire).

Basically what i am asking is if you had say 10k to spend, what in your mind would be the best way to get 2-3 sleds to the steep and back? (colorado-Idaho)
Sled deck and single place open when there is 3 (don't like this idea too much)
2 place hybrid and one in the box with endgate closed.
7.5x16 v nose aluminum enclosed (really going to suck down fuel.)
Keep rocking the 18' open I already own and deal with the road slop in the new sleds.
Kind of scared of a 7' wide as we get in some hellacious cross winds in montana could be solved with a sway control.

So what would you do?
 

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DUKHTR3

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Keep using the open trailer. Trust me you won't do it more then a couple times before you will want a diesel truck but this will get you by.

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kanedog

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Use whatever gets you to the snow!!!!!!yea!!!
 

NorthMNSledder

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You will be amazed how close the MPG on that hybrid trailer is compared to a 7' with the 5' V is. I would actually bet the V trailer does better.

I put almost 6,000 miles on this set-up (Triton TC 167) winter before last thinking it was going to be the best MPG set-up out there for running an enclosed trailer. I sold the trailer after the season and I'm looking to pick up a 7' wide enclosed.

IMG_6738.jpg
 

rmk01r1der

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I'd throw a salt shield on the front of your open trailer and keep using it. Half tons pull enclosed trailers just fine, until you find some wind...
 

Reg2view

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until you find some wind...
And long grades at altitude with the GM.

Open trailer with a shield and great covers. Don't know if those really exist anymore for today's sleds. You already know what the roads do to sleds on open trailers on the I system. Likely your safest solution, don't know if you're trailer is braked. A shorter inline could be done with a stab bar and beefing up the truck with bags or timbrens, but they're not gonna help you stop or going down steep grades. Three sleds make it tougher than two, as you'll likely need at least a 16 with a 5 ft V. Any might be tough to find unless you order now (and not high end), or are lucky to run across used. With 3 guys and covered gear in the bed and an inline, you might be close to GVWR. More reasons to stick with an open.
 

North Dakota 322

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Trailer I have now has all new running gear under it and brakes on both axles.
Another problem with the trailer I have now is it pulls like a brick. Buddy's stock 16 chevy 2500 diesel got 10-11 mpg running 75-80.
10in tires pull like a brick even at 80 psi.

Diesel truck is in the 5 year plan at the moment. Just not right now.

Couple questions on a enclosed.
Is there much of a MPG difference between the tall (7ft) or the shorter (6ft)?
7 or 7.5 wide? Eventual plan would be to spray foam and heat to melt sleds off.
aluminum and tandem axle is a must.

Lots of experience towing with equipment trailers, new to enclosed.

Lots of good info here, really have the wheels turning now.
 

kanedog

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75-80mph with 10” tires at 80psi........Towing at 75-80mph or tiny 10” tires overloaded or the 80psi in the tires. One of the above is likely to ruin your trip. Are you a red neck? Hahaha
 

Reg2view

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Owned very low, low 6ft inline, and tall inline, all pulled by oil burners. It's the cross winds, and that's where length matters as much as height for MPG. Low better in cross winds, handling wise, all suffer in mpg. Had a long, low Floe 22+V clamshell enclosed with 14's that pulled like a dream, but with 50mph cross wind impact would still drop mpg 3 mph behind a programmed dmax. Cross winds worse than head winds for all of them. In snow, that Floe did have a track width the same as the truck - and with four sleds in it, tracked as good as it gets. The Floe clamshells are a pain to load and unload (flipping ramp and interior height), doors freeze, and take up space, but do pull exceptionally well - I had a 22 four place, an in-law had a 16 that hauled three. Still see a few out there, including 20s. Don't discount them for long-distance hauling behind a 1500 with 14 wheels. Can't fix the load/unload and doors PITA.
 
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boondocker97

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I definitely wouldn't do the deck in that short of a box with a 1/2 ton. My dad has one of these 3-place open deck trailers with the front salt shield/ramps and upgraded rim size with brakes. I want to say his are 14" wheels but they might be 15". It seems to pull pretty well and has been really handy for hauling just a couple sleds. https://www.alumaklm.com/recreation...4-8616-snowmobile-trailers#standard-equipment

I would say get the truck you want first before committing to an enclosed of any real size. Once you have the enclosed you start adding insulation, finished inside, cabinets, heaters, etc. all adds up and makes it heavier. If you get one small enough to pull with the 1/2 ton in the wind, spend the money to get it set up how you want, then get a larger truck, you'll want a larger trailer, and then sink that setup money into the next trailer all over again.
 
Nov 30, 2007
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Trailer I have now has all new running gear under it and brakes on both axles.
Another problem with the trailer I have now is it pulls like a brick. Buddy's stock 16 chevy 2500 diesel got 10-11 mpg running 75-80.
10in tires pull like a brick even at 80 psi.

Diesel truck is in the 5 year plan at the moment. Just not right now.

Couple questions on a enclosed.
Is there much of a MPG difference between the tall (7ft) or the shorter (6ft)?
7 or 7.5 wide
? Eventual plan would be to spray foam and heat to melt sleds off.
aluminum and tandem axle is a must.

Lots of experience towing with equipment trailers, new to enclosed.

Lots of good info here, really have the wheels turning now.
To the bold question. I have been pulling 7 wide X 6ft tall 24' with 5' V for years. This season I switched to 7.5 wide X 7ft tall with the same brand and in the same length. There is a significant difference in pulling. I honestly can't tell you if it is the width or height that makes the most difference, but it feels significant. MPG change varies with winds. High head/cross winds for the whole trip can make almost 2 mpg running the same gasser tow vehicle. It was rare to see those numbers. Many of the fills were just under 1 mpg less. Towing speeds were the same, but it just took more work to move the bigger walls.

There were some advantages to the larger trailer. Companies are switching because of the SXS market. (Those don't fit 7W X 6T trailers) The slightly higher ceiling is nice if you are working inside a lot. The width didn't make much difference for my situation with sleds. Still hauled the same number, just had a little more room to get around them. The change that was a little surprising were the larger doors. The ramps are a bit longer and wider. Not really a big deal, but something to note.
 

North Dakota 322

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75-80mph with 10” tires at 80psi........Towing at 75-80mph or tiny 10” tires overloaded or the 80psi in the tires. One of the above is likely to ruin your trip. Are you a red neck? Hahaha
Well within the speed, weight and load ratings for my application. No problems so far, 15k MI on them. Going to get a new set before too long.
I am a big sickler about getting the best tires out there for anything I own. I hate flats.

https://www.etrailer.com/p-AM1HP56.html This is what I run and have had very good luck.
  • Load range: E
  • Ply rating: 10
  • Maximum load: 1,650 lbs at 90 psi
  • Maximum speed: 87 mph (speed rating N)

. This season I switched to 7.5 wide X 7ft tall with the same brand and in the same length. There is a significant difference in pulling. I honestly can't tell you if it is the width or height that makes the most difference, but it feels significant. MPG change varies with winds. High head/cross winds for the whole trip can make almost 2 mpg running the same gasser tow vehicle. It was rare to see those numbers. Many of the fills were just under 1 mpg less. Towing speeds were the same, but it just took more work to move the bigger walls.

There were some advantages to the larger trailer. Companies are switching because of the SXS market. (Those don't fit 7W X 6T trailers) The slightly higher ceiling is nice if you are working inside a lot. The width didn't make much difference for my situation with sleds. Still hauled the same number, just had a little more room to get around them. The change that was a little surprising were the larger doors. The ramps are a bit longer and wider. Not really a big deal, but something to note.
To sum it up, the 7.5 wide costs you 1-2 MPG.
Good to know.

I would say get the truck you want first before committing to an enclosed of any real size. Once you have the enclosed you start adding insulation, finished inside, cabinets, heaters, etc. all adds up and makes it heavier. If you get one small enough to pull with the 1/2 ton in the wind, spend the money to get it set up how you want, then get a larger truck, you'll want a larger trailer, and then sink that setup money into the next trailer all over again.

Starts getting really heavy quick for a gasser
I Guess i should put up with the open for now and go talk to the dealer about trading off the work truck. :)

Owned very low 8ft, 6ft inline, and tall inline, all pulled by oil burners. It's the cross winds, and that's where length matters as much as height for MPG. Low better in cross winds, handling wise, all suffer in mpg. Had a long, low Floe 22+V clamshell enclosed with 14's that pulled like a dream, but with 50mph cross wind impact would still drop mpg 3 mph behind a programmed dmax. Cross winds worse than head winds for all of them. In snow, that Floe did have a track width the same as the truck - and with four sleds in it, tracked as good as it gets. The Floe clamshells are a pain to load and unload (flipping ramp and interior height), doors freeze, and take up space, but do pull exceptionally well - I had a 22 four place, an in-law had a 16 that hauled three. Still see a few out there, including 20s. Don't discount them for long-distance hauling behind a 1500 with 14 wheels. Can't fix the load/unload and doors PITA.
I wonder how a Hybrid would pull compared to a clamshell. Have used them and know the struggles with them.

"Cross winds worse than headwinds for all of them." It seems like every time we pass Bismark we are in a 20 mph cross wind. Never would have thought a enclosed would suck fuel that much more though.


So basically i am crazy for trying to run a inclosed behind a half ton. Good to know.
 

gonehuntnpowder

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I would go with the 7 wide vnose. If you aren’t going to use it for anything else I would spec it out with the lowest roof possible. If it’s for hauling sleds the low roof only makes you pay attention and sit down when you pull in. You may have to get dressed outside, but it’s a small compromise for the ease in pulling. Regardless how heavy I would run an anti sway hitch. Lots of guys want their trailer to be a mountain man cave. I just want to load my sh!t and get the hell home.
 

Teth-Air

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Well within the speed, weight and load ratings for my application. No problems so far, 15k MI on them. Going to get a new set before too long.
I am a big sickler about getting the best tires out there for anything I own. I hate flats.

https://www.etrailer.com/p-AM1HP56.html This is what I run and have had very good luck.
  • Load range: E
  • Ply rating: 10
  • Maximum load: 1,650 lbs at 90 psi
  • Maximum speed: 87 mph (speed rating N)

It isn't just about the tire rating, those bearings will be spinning so fast that it will be hard to keep grease in them..
 

Blk88GT

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I can't suggest the sled deck with a really short box half ton. I have ran one for 10 years on a 3/4 ton CCSB and now a 1 ton CCLB. Every trip is at minimum 1100 miles.

There are times I wish I had a smaller enclosed, but the rest of the time I enjoy the versatility of the deck.

I did have a 12ft Floe with the gull wing doors. It towed great, like it wasn't even there. If I had a 1/2 ton and 2 sleds, I think that would be the ticket. Put the gear in the truck under a topper or tonneau cover.
 
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To follow up on the mileage difference I've seen on 7.5 vs 7 wide. The difference isn't a truly direct comparison since the the 7.5 is also a foot taller. That is an extra 60sq ft of sail.
I do agree with the cross wind affect with the taller trailer. It is very noticeable with a lighter rated tow rig. I use a variety of vehicles including a 1ton regular cab single, suburbans, three different 1/2 ton extended cabs, and even a ridgeline at times. They can all "pull", but the pucker factor goes up fast with lighter rating and iffy conditions. The mileage variation is also greater when using the lighter rigs. The 1 ton isn't the best every day driver, but it doesn't mind the trailer as much.

We usually head out every other week during the season and tick off about a 1,000 flatland tow miles each trip. The tow rig is used as an errand runner when we get to the destination. Vehicle choice is an option on every trip and it is relatively simple. Go out to the shop and choose. The standard suspension burb gets the nod most of the time. The pickups are more work because of snow burying the gear in the box. The auto air suspension on the fancy burb changes height a lot when hooking and unhooking. It's just more work, even though the towing is fairly decent.
It might sound like a lazy man decision process and it is basically true. The overall rig package is about the convenience of riding when we get to the destination.

Trailer and vehicle choices vary for everyone's situation.
I did prefer the shorter sidewall trailer for towing. The biggest factor going to a taller/wider choice was the flexibility to haul S X Ss in the same trailer. The convenience of a taller wider trailer wasn't worth the trade off without that factor.
 
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