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-   -   Carrying avalanche gear (https://www.snowest.com/forum/showthread.php?t=441844)

Cat-man-Doo 03-28-2018 09:43 PM

Carrying avalanche gear
 
Just about everyone carries their shovel and probe in a backpack. I don't ride in avalanche prone conditions (not into highmarking or that sort of thing) but ride the backcountry and feel that avy gear should be carried. I'm not really interested in wearing a backpack if i don't have to and I see that there is an outfit that makes a shovel rack for the tunnel that uses the skidoo linqs. Thoughts on carrying the shovel on your back as opposed to on the tunnel??

Ryan-41 03-29-2018 02:07 PM

I have been curious about this as well, I have always carried my shovel in my avalanche air bag, but have thought for a while if your buddy is caught in an avalanche, you would ride away on your sled out of the run out zone and then use your sled to get close with your beacon and if your shovel was on your tunnel you could probably get it out quicker than if in your back pack. I am interested to hear what other people's opinions are.

SLEDPEDDLER 03-29-2018 04:07 PM

Have one on my backpack as well as on the sled, make sure you have a steel head and not plastic!

kiliki 03-29-2018 04:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SLEDPEDDLER (Post 4144747)
Have one on my backpack as well as on the sled, make sure you have a steel head and not plastic!

This^^ for you guys who do not want a back pack you can keep it down to the basics. life safety only in the pack and use the tunnel bag for all other stuff. You can have a condition when the sled is covered and you are not, now your shovel is covered and your buddies are covered.
this did happen at the big iron shootout a few years back.
i keep one on the sled and my pack.

Solarguy 03-29-2018 04:32 PM

Avi instructors and experienced back country riders would recommend all your avi gear be carried in or on your pack. Obvious reason would be swept off your sled and separated where you are not buried and need to help others in your group. Your sled could be buried or?

capulin overdrive 03-29-2018 04:42 PM

Get it, i hate wearing a back pack, but really should have the stuff on your body.


Could look at vests or other smaller more comfortable means of carrying the stuff. Mystery Ranch used to make a pack called the broomstick that was basically shovel and probe. Now they just make smaller packs. Vest seems the best, and many offer trauma and stab protection.


Lots of people do both. One in the pack, one on the sled for easy reach and not having to take pack off.


It's your life and comfort level. Took several years of riding, but my pack saved my *** this winter. Stuffed it on top of a really steep sidehill in tits deep snow. Bike stayed at the top, and i went down the hill. Only way back was to take the pack off and use it to keep from sinking in the snow and crawl up the deep snow. Was just too deep to posthole.

XFIRE800 04-04-2018 06:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cat-man-Doo (Post 4144603)
Just about everyone carries their shovel and probe in a backpack. I don't ride in avalanche prone conditions (not into highmarking or that sort of thing) but ride the backcountry and feel that avy gear should be carried. I'm not really interested in wearing a backpack if i don't have to and I see that there is an outfit that makes a shovel rack for the tunnel that uses the skidoo linqs. Thoughts on carrying the shovel on your back as opposed to on the tunnel??



One of the biggest misconceptions is “i dont ride in avalanche prone conditions”.

I have had the opportunity to ride in dozens of different riding areas, and even when its a high danger day and we do everything possible to limit risk, there are still avalanche hazards. These hazards im talking about are at the place everyone feels safe and sound, the trail.... There are more trails with avalanche terrain above them than a person would ever guess. Once i started looking i realized how unaware we really are about this. There are also many small hills and terrain traps that could bury you than a person would guess. The best thing you can do is get educated on the snow, whether you highmark or not.

Now onto the original question.

Yes you should absolutely 100% have a backpack on everytime you are riding in the mountains. As stated above, if you dont have a shovel on YOU and your sled gets buried, you don’t, but you buddy does, guess what the outcome is. If weight is an issue try on the new avy vests from bca. The weight distribution makes you forget youre wearing it. That slight hindrance could save your friends life. Remember, this gear isn’t about you, its about your friends and loved ones.

NorthMNSledder 04-04-2018 06:48 AM

I go absolutely minimum in my Avi pack as I have had back issues all my life. All my Avi gear and survival stuff goes in that. On the sled tunnel pack I carry a bigger shovel (largest one BCA makes from a few years back). The one on the tunnel gets used a bunch but is much easier and faster to access. Plus if I can help it I don't like to take my avi pack off. With the shovel on the tunnel I can use that for digging out sleds or whatever else I want a shovel for.

If you spend some time shopping for your backpack or avi bag you can really find one that is a better fit for your body. I used to hate having a pack on. now that I have one that fits my body I don't even notice it anymore.

inspector01 04-04-2018 07:21 AM

Whenever this comes up, I instantly think of this case.

https://www.sawtoothavalanche.com/ac...ent2-16-14.pdf


I keep my smaller/lighter shovel in my pack, and my bigger shovel on the tunnel.

kiliki 04-04-2018 07:38 AM

we ride around that area all the time, its no joke.

bholmlate 04-04-2018 03:21 PM

There was something said in an avalanche seminar that has always stuck with me. A beacon, shovel, and pole are nothing more then body recovery devices. Its up to you to make sure you recover the body's alive. We have sink holes and other obstacles that can sneak up and grab you or your your sled in a second. that is why, like others have said, I carry one on my sled and one strapped to my backpack.

SRXSRULE 04-08-2018 07:46 AM

For all the guys that dont like wearing a backpack you really should try on a few of the vests. They fit and ride so much nicer. You truly dont even notice them when riding and they dont hurt your back.

gonehuntnpowder 04-08-2018 09:35 AM

I think a vest would be great, but I worry about adjustability. I am not a small guy.

XFIRE800 04-08-2018 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gonehuntnpowder (Post 4146642)
I think a vest would be great, but I worry about adjustability. I am not a small guy.



BCA’s new one is adjustable and gets BIG

gonehuntnpowder 04-08-2018 11:24 AM

I grew up in the no backpack generation. Put it all on the sled. In the past I have just carried a hydration pack with the bladder our and just my beacon, radio, fire starting and first aid stuff.

Before next season I will go to a Avalanche vest or backpack with all the necessary stuff in it. To get ready this summer I will take one oh my old backpacks and fill it to the appropriate weight and wear it when I walk the dog, and mow the lawn, most anything I do outside. May look strange, but the neighbors already think I am the crazy old guy.

JungleJim 04-08-2018 12:03 PM

I had back and shoulder issues so switched from an ABS pack to a BCA Avi-Vest and absoutely LOVE it! By cinching the waist belt tight almost all the weight is carried on my hips. The combo of having the teckvest protection all built in works really well. The new shovel carry system works great too. I'm a XL or bigger kind of a guy and the adjustability allows for a very good fit. Definitely check it out...

Colbymh 09-02-2018 12:44 AM

tragic story but lots of contradictions. How did they know the danger was rated high and observed several fresh avalanches but didnt recognize they were in an avalanche zone, thinking they were in a safe zone.

Regardless, thats horrible but glad there was survivors. It just sucks ur literally gonna wear a vest and shovel/probe for someone else.

polaris dude 09-02-2018 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Colbymh (Post 4158195)
tragic story but lots of contradictions. How did they know the danger was rated high and observed several fresh avalanches but didnt recognize they were in an avalanche zone, thinking they were in a safe zone.

Regardless, thats horrible but glad there was survivors. It just sucks ur literally gonna wear a vest and shovel/probe for someone else.

I guess if you don't like the people you ride with it sucks?

If you ride with people who don't put their gear on their back for you then it just sucks for you?

Big10inch 09-02-2018 01:27 PM

I think people WAY over think the whole avy thing. In 15 years of mountain riding we have never had to use a beacon or dig anybody out of an avalanche. Can it happen? Certainly and it takes a few lives each year but driving your car or eating fatty foods are both arguably more dangerous as they take far more lives than sledding.


I fully expect those who fear everything to respond to this. I was once one of the fearful, wore an avy pack before they were cool. Now it sits on a shelf, haven't worn it for years. I don't wear a pack as it hinders my riding enjoyment. I carry a shovel on my sled for when I or someone else gets stuck.


Back in the day it was hi-marking, and it was probably pretty dangerous at times. These days it is in the trees where slides are extremely rare. hauling all that extra crap around just doesn't make sense to me anymore. It just never gets used. I figure if it is my time, it just is, pretty much the same feeling from the rest of the group. The most dangerous guy in our group used to ride with all the gear, take all the classes but he ended up dead from a heart attack when most of us were certain he would die on a sled one day.


I think most of you worry way to much, or you are taking stupid chances. Quit worrying and enjoy your rides... All that junk on your back is no insurance at all that you wont die that day. Safety is a myth sold by fear mongers. Use your head, that is the best safety feature you have. If that fails, I am pretty sure we can chalk it up to natural selection. Most sled deaths are not accidents but seriously poor decision making. Most of them carried the gear and it didn't do a damn bit of good...

christopher 09-02-2018 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big10inch (Post 4158230)
I think people WAY over think the whole avy thing....



Wow...

Big10inch 09-02-2018 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by christopher (Post 4158253)
Wow...



So you think I should believe the hype over my own long term experience?


Maybe 10 accidents a year out of a couple hundred thousand cumulative sledding days justifies the fear spread? I would be very curious to see real numbers on this. I do not think it is nearly as dangerous as some people espouse. Potentially dangerous but, that again is based on a lot of unsubstantiated fear.

goridedoo 09-03-2018 12:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big10inch (Post 4158230)
I think people WAY over think the whole avy thing. In 15 years of mountain riding we have never had to use a beacon or dig anybody out of an avalanche. Can it happen? Certainly and it takes a few lives each year but driving your car or eating fatty foods are both arguably more dangerous as they take far more lives than sledding.


I fully expect those who fear everything to respond to this. I was once one of the fearful, wore an avy pack before they were cool. Now it sits on a shelf, haven't worn it for years. I don't wear a pack as it hinders my riding enjoyment. I carry a shovel on my sled for when I or someone else gets stuck.


Back in the day it was hi-marking, and it was probably pretty dangerous at times. These days it is in the trees where slides are extremely rare. hauling all that extra crap around just doesn't make sense to me anymore. It just never gets used. I figure if it is my time, it just is, pretty much the same feeling from the rest of the group. The most dangerous guy in our group used to ride with all the gear, take all the classes but he ended up dead from a heart attack when most of us were certain he would die on a sled one day.


I think most of you worry way to much, or you are taking stupid chances. Quit worrying and enjoy your rides... All that junk on your back is no insurance at all that you wont die that day. Safety is a myth sold by fear mongers. Use your head, that is the best safety feature you have. If that fails, I am pretty sure we can chalk it up to natural selection. Most sled deaths are not accidents but seriously poor decision making. Most of them carried the gear and it didn't do a damn bit of good...

LOL the day one of your riding buddies dies because you don’t have shovel to dig out his slowly suffocating body is gonna be a real sad wake up call. Its not about YOU and its sad that some people dont get that. Ignorance at its best.... but hey it was his time OH WELL.

Big10inch 09-03-2018 05:17 AM

...and you could step off the curb tomorrow and be run over by a bus.


Honestly, how about a discussion based on actual facts regarding the actual risks? This notion that I am selfish and ignorant is ridiculous, you do not know me or the people I ride with at all. You do not know where we ride or how we ride. You are making some pretty bold assumptions. It is so ridiculous that you do not even know what precautions we do take and you want to call me ignorant. That sir is the pot calling the kettle black if I have ever seen it.


I think some REAL education on the subject would be nice. This fear mongering is what is truly ridiculous.

goridedoo 09-03-2018 08:33 AM

I know you ride in Soco and I know I have friends who lost a friend in Soco a few years ago just feet from the trail because they couldnt get him dug up in time, they did not have shovels. Its real and it does happen.

What is actual education gonna do for you? Clearly you are unreceptive to it.

I have been in places on the trail hundreds of yards from the nearest hill where you can look up and see branches broke 30ft up from a previous slide. I also know people ride on that trail all the time with out beacons or gear. Its just not fair to SAR and folks who end up in a probe line the next day and get to dig up a blue body. Not fair to the mothers, wives, and children. It happens every year.

Fear mongering... call us all chicken chits for using our heads and wanting to come home with the same amount of people we went out with. I guess I never buckle up on the drive west, maybe I’m the ignorant one, but then again me wearing my seatbelt has nothing to do with whether or not the guy in the passenger seat lives.

https://avalanche.state.co.us/caic/a...=597&accfm=inv

goridedoo 09-03-2018 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big10inch (Post 4158230)
I think people WAY over think the whole avy thing. In 15 years of mountain riding we have never had to use a beacon or dig anybody out of an avalanche. Can it happen? Certainly and it takes a few lives each year but driving your car or eating fatty foods are both arguably more dangerous as they take far more lives than sledding.


I fully expect those who fear everything to respond to this. I was once one of the fearful, wore an avy pack before they were cool. Now it sits on a shelf, haven't worn it for years. I don't wear a pack as it hinders my riding enjoyment. I carry a shovel on my sled for when I or someone else gets stuck.


Back in the day it was hi-marking, and it was probably pretty dangerous at times. These days it is in the trees where slides are extremely rare. hauling all that extra crap around just doesn't make sense to me anymore. It just never gets used. I figure if it is my time, it just is, pretty much the same feeling from the rest of the group. The most dangerous guy in our group used to ride with all the gear, take all the classes but he ended up dead from a heart attack when most of us were certain he would die on a sled one day.


I think most of you worry way to much, or you are taking stupid chances. Quit worrying and enjoy your rides... All that junk on your back is no insurance at all that you wont die that day. Safety is a myth sold by fear mongers. Use your head, that is the best safety feature you have. If that fails, I am pretty sure we can chalk it up to natural selection. Most sled deaths are not accidents but seriously poor decision making. Most of them carried the gear and it didn't do a damn bit of good...

And as far as those who fear everything being the ones who respond... I dont fear alot of things but losing a friend when I could have done something scares the hell out of me as well as my friends having to live the rest of their lives knowing they potentially could have saved my life. I don’t “worry” when I am riding, I go prepared and educated. And I ENJOY every ride.


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