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-   -   Has anyone seen the new Evo from Polaris? (https://www.snowest.com/forum/showthread.php?t=441694)

SpencerA 03-22-2018 11:12 AM

Has anyone seen the new Evo from Polaris?
 
Very interested in this sled for my 8 year old. Has anyone had a chance to see them in person?

Snowmow 03-22-2018 12:45 PM

Havenít seen one yet.

Heard from a friend (that was at the Polaris new model expo in Florida) that itís a smaller sled than what it looks likes in pictures.

To bad it wasnít lighter, fuel injected, longer track and deeper lugs. Real shame for anyone in the mountains.

I picked up a 2016 IQR 600 recently in a trade deal. It has a 128Ē 1.75Ēlug track. Itís also just carbureted. For the price and capabilities I think a IQRís are a great option if you havenít looked at them.

Reeb 03-22-2018 11:56 PM

My Dad just ordered one for one of his customers. Each dealer only gets one. I canít wait to check it out and see how the transition from the 200 is for the boy getting it. This is his third new sled in as many years. 120,200,EVO.

I agree that it would have a longer track etc etc but Polaris is trying to keep the price down and the target audience is getting kids to join their families in a trail riding setting.
I believe my Dads customer already has an eye for a 136-141 and some better shocks but I keep imploring them to try it as is first.

My first ďbigĒ sled was a 440 fan with a 121. An old Prowler from back in the day. I learned how to jump and sidehill on that sled. I think this one will do just fine.


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SpencerA 03-23-2018 10:36 AM

Do you guys think this is a big upgrade from a 03 340? My 8 year old wants more off trail capabilities. 340 is do wide and rider position is to far back. Should I look for s freestyle or get a eco and put a talller lug?

Snowmow 03-23-2018 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SpencerA (Post 4143453)
Do you guys think this is a big upgrade from a 03 340? My 8 year old wants more off trail capabilities. 340 is do wide and rider position is to far back. Should I look for s freestyle or get a eco and put a talller lug?



For me. I donít see where the EVO Bridges any gaps in the snowmobile chain. Unless your stuck on saying you own a brand new sled model for your kid. Really donít see any advantage over a Freestyl or a iqr600.

Scott 03-23-2018 09:06 PM

I've ridden it.

Chris Brown, Eric Woog, Darrin Pfost and I ran them around a field in West Yellowstone in 2 feet of virgin set up powder.

There is a lot to say about this sled.

It's not necessarily a children's sled.
It bridges the gap so that new riders don't feel intimidated by bigger wider or taller faster sleds.

You can remove the throttle block so they can have a longer throttle range or pull. You can get past that governor when you change the throttle block so if you have somebody that wants to dive off the trail and hammer the throttle you have a little bit more to work with.

It goes 50 miles an hour.

Marty Sampson told us that they had a couple of young non-motorsport college girls be their test mules when they developed the sled. They put a lot of hours in field testing and on the trails. They took them out on the trails after a while and put them on the bigger sleds. All the girls wanted was to go back to the Evo.

It's lower, a little wider, more stable, more comfortable, and less intimidating.
It's not intended to be an EVO RMK.
(I SUSPECT there may be something like that in the future though, for the more western EVO customer)
The difference is like going from sitting on the RMK and moving over to the Rush or the XC.

It has a more plush and ergonomicly comfortable feel for a trail ride for an inexperienced rider.

If you take your grandmother or your inexperienced wife or your bigger children out on this thing it will be great for them.

Now that I've been around it, listened to the engineers and RODE IT... I get it. I really get it this is a great idea for them.

Merlin 03-25-2018 07:53 PM

That's good to hear!


Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott (Post 4143613)
(I SUSPECT there may be something like that in the future though, for the more western EVO customer)


SpencerA 03-25-2018 08:52 PM

I think Iím going to order one. With a longer track and taller lug it will be perfect for my 8 year old.

Escmanaze 03-28-2018 06:31 PM

2 things!!!!!
 
I would only NEED to see two things different on an "EVO RMK" model in order to have absolute plans to buy one in a year or two(right now my kid is still REALLY happy on his snoscoot).

1. Un-lower it. This would be the easiest change in the world. Just give it the standard indy skid instead of this weird modified lowered skid they put on it.

2. Put 1.75" lugs on it. Exact track match here. It's just a little different PO to Camoplast. That's it. This should be the second easiest change in the world.

There are other things that would be good too (narrower ski stance, geared down, belt drive, carbon parts), but just those two things would be enough to tip me over the edge completely. It seems so easy. What am I missing?

But to answer the initial question, no I haven't seen one, I would love to check one out. Unfortunately, with each dealer only getting one, it might be a while before I actually see one in person.

Scott 03-28-2018 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Escmanaze (Post 4144565)
I would only NEED to see two things different on an "EVO RMK" model in order to have absolute plans to buy one in a year or two(right now my kid is still REALLY happy on his snoscoot).

1. Un-lower it. This would be the easiest change in the world. Just give it the standard indy skid instead of this weird modified lowered skid they put on it.

2. Put 1.75" lugs on it. Exact track match here. It's just a little different PO to Camoplast. That's it. This should be the second easiest change in the world.

There are other things that would be good too (narrower ski stance, geared down, belt drive, carbon parts), but just those two things would be enough to tip me over the edge completely. It seems so easy. What am I missing?

But to answer the initial question, no I haven't seen one, I would love to check one out. Unfortunately, with each dealer only getting one, it might be a while before I actually see one in person.

"Unlowered" and "narrowed" would diminish the stability they are striving for with the target audience of "non-aggressive riders".

Not sure about the carbon parts though...that would affect the lowered price point. Which 12 year old or inexperienced (and intimidated by the bigger chassis) 65 year old gramma is going to really see a benefit from a carbon over-structure or other parts that might drop 20 pounds? I really don't think it will make a difference.

Geared down and belt drive....I suspect you CAN hold your breath on that one.

Escmanaze 03-29-2018 12:45 AM

heartbreak
 
What you are saying is breaking my heart. When they came out with the indy evo video, the message I received was that they were finally at least trying to make something for little people, and not just "inexperienced" or "non-aggressive" people. There are already a billion sleds out there from all 3 manufacturers that fit the bill just fine for an inexperienced and non-aggressive rider. I was hoping from watching the reveal video and the ad video that they were finally going to show some interest in aggressive and experienced approximately 11 year old boys. Now, here we are 3 months later, and I have a Polaris ambassador (so I'm prone to believe you) telling me that "it's not necessarily a children's sled" and it just breaks my heart.

Thanks to the Snoscoot 8 year olds everywhere are beginning to learn the fundamentals of boondocking and getting a tippy tall sled up on one ski. In a couple years, there's no question these same kids will be more than ready for an EVO RMK in whatever form Polaris might be willing to offer it, and just like the regular RMK line, there's reason to believe that the tippier the sled, the better it will ride in the west.

I think Polaris might just be surprised to see how many dads out there would be willing to snocheck an EVO RMK PRO version that includes all the features that used to take a 450 pound RMK and turn it into a 409 pound RMK PRO. It sure seems to me like all those same parts that existed before should exist still, whether it is carbon overstructure and bumper, or a belt drive or whatever it was Polaris did a few years ago. Now we would really be in business. A tall tippy 36" stance EVO RMK PRO weighing in at about 370 with all the mountain ready features of my AXYS (ie boards, paddle track, maybe 136 track). Yes, you better believe I would be just fine paying a SIGNIFICANTLY higher price for that sled than the current iteration of EVO that I'm seeing now.

I really hope you're not playing with my emotions on that geared down and belt drive thing. That would be two really AWESOME upgrades I would love to see to that sled. At that point, I would really just need to replace the skid to make it taller, the A arms to make it skinnier, and the boards to make it so the kid doesn't just slip right off of it after spending some time in the powder. Oh and the track to get some decent paddles on there. With it geared down it seems like that would set it up perfect to replace the track with a taller lug.

Reeb 03-29-2018 01:01 AM

I often think the same way you do when I play on my emotions.

But then I have to take a step back and realize I learned how to carve, sidehill, and jump all on a Ď91 Prowler. My Ď93 Jag Z Special wasnít any more nimble and still had a 121Ē track and steel skis. I was 7-8years old and even raced ovals and my first hillclimb with the Jag Z.

Now it wasnít until I was 13 or so that I got a Summit 500 that was significantly narrower, had a 136 and more power. But could I ever ride that thing once I got my hands on it. I gave my dads friends on brand new Powder Special 600EFIís fits all day long and usually came out on top.

Itís all perspective and if your kid can do things on the EVO that I could on an old Prowler, they wonít be batting an eye when they finally get to ride moms 600 or your 800.

With that being said, a beltdrive, carbon over structure, seat, skid, and 136Ē track without heat exchangers should be knocking on 370lbs and THAT would be a riot. Even for Dads like us.


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Escmanaze 03-29-2018 01:27 AM

For sure.

To be fair, referring back to the original post, I still haven't ridden one, so I should certainly reserve too much judgement that is based solely on conceptual thought.

You're right, it is emotions in me. It's just that I've seen what the snoscoot did for my kids riding in so many ways this year, and I just really really really want that to continue 2 years down the road instead of getting stuck in a rut and getting addicted to snowskiing somewhere in the age of 10-14 instead.

Like I said, even if they do nothing to the EVO, I'm still a likely customer in a year or two, but man it's hard to not fantasize about an EVO RMK or an EVO RMK PRO and think about how much more fun we could have, not only with this first kid, but with the two behind him as well.

Reeb 03-29-2018 02:04 AM

I went ahead and built my own version of what we are talking about. My daughter is 11 and just wants to trail ride whereas my oldest boy is power sliding the 120 thru corners at 5. And my smallest canít keep away from anything with a motor. The kid is ridiculous.

But back to the sled. It was a 440 fan with a 141x2.25Ē Chromoly front end, new style rear skid. Ti springs all the way around. Etc etc etc. Itís well under 400lbs but how far I donít know anymore.
It hasnít been run in years since my brother graduated to his 800 PRO.
This summer Iíll put a 570 in it and have acquired plastics and a lexan hood to change the look of it and lighten it up some more.
That will be my version of a Mtn EVO. But who knows, maybe the old girl does get replaced by a Mtn version of the EVO. In the meantime Iíll keep tinkering on this old girl.


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SpencerA 03-29-2018 09:38 AM

I almost ordered one for my 8 year but ended up finding a 550 backcountry for him which will be better for his riding style. Cost wise I believe Polaris nailed it. What deterred me is itís a trail sled that I would have to put a decent amount of cash into making it off trail capable. Another thing I didnít like was not knowing how much the kit was to do the shock upgrades and governor delete. I heard it could be several thousand dollars.

For those of you who are much more connected to the manufacturers have you heard anything about works on a future RMK model? Or other manufacturers doing future mountain models for younger generations?

Snowmow 03-29-2018 12:36 PM

Why isnít the Polaris IQR a spoken about option? Size seems right, easy to get parts and to modify with increased skill levels.

Escmanaze 03-29-2018 04:13 PM

knowledge
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Snowmow (Post 4144710)
Why isn’t the Polaris IQR a spoken about option? Size seems right, easy to get parts and to modify with increased skill levels.

For me: Because I know nothing about them. Got links or something where I can learn? Google search of polaris IQR isn't bringing up very much that is very useful.

Edit: Okay, I have researched them a bit more and now I know why they aren't on my radar. Looks really cool, but unquestionably, you are buying a project, not a product. For lots of guys on here that's fine, for me, that's not at all what I'm looking for. As much as possible, I'm looking to maximize my ratio of ride time to tinker/garage time. IQR would definitely not fit my style in that respect.

Snowmow 03-29-2018 06:38 PM

Has anyone seen the new Evo from Polaris?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Escmanaze (Post 4144748)
For me: Because I know nothing about them. Got links or something where I can learn? Google search of polaris IQR isn't bringing up very much that is very useful.

Edit: Okay, I have researched them a bit more and now I know why they aren't on my radar. Looks really cool, but unquestionably, you are buying a project, not a product. For lots of guys on here that's fine, for me, that's not at all what I'm looking for. As much as possible, I'm looking to maximize my ratio of ride time to tinker/garage time. IQR would definitely not fit my style in that respect.



At what point in your research did it make you turn away. Iím honestly curious.

I took a 2016 IQR 600 thatís in show room condition on trade for a 2018 klx110 sno ripper I had.

But I also got a great deal on a 2012 PRO RMK 600 155 that needs a crank and pistons.

Iím currently rebuilding the 600 rmk for a long Term sled for my daughter.


But in waiting for parts for the RMK My daughter is riding the IQR . She struggled with it for the first hour or so, coming off a snow bike. But after that. She did very well! The ergonomics were great. She can stand flat footed on the boards, throttle and brake levers are not out of reach, heated grips work great, factory tether is awesome, 1.75Ē paddle track gets around in powder snow better than anything she has ridden to date, looks awesome, Draws a crowd at the parking area with a young kid on it! People love seeing young kids riding. I love seeing the enthusiasm in random people when they see the next gen, ridding cool sleds and having fun.

Iíve never seen a sled so accessible and well built as this IQR is. Itís TUFF!! The shock package is amazing, the clutching and HP are awesome, Adjustable timing with the turn of a knob, heated grips, head light, small over all package, great traction for a shorter track sled, stable width..... I donít see the downfall for a up and coming snowmobile kid. I would keep it if i didnt have this Pro RMK 600 that i bought for For next to nothing.

Scott 03-29-2018 10:19 PM

Don't misunderstand me...the EVO IS an in-between sled for mid-sized riders. But it's not just that. It's also for those I stated in my other post.

Also, I don't think the EVO RMK is out of the question, but Polaris will need to keep the price point down.

Escmanaze 03-29-2018 10:23 PM

no one point
 
It wasn't any exact one point. Just lots of various reading on it led me to believe (potentially incorrectly) that it wasn't a buy it and ride it product but instead it was more of a buy it, work on it for a while. Decide exactly how you want to "build" it and then work on it for a couple months and then test it out and then see what you want to change and then test it out again etc. etc. Again, some guys love that - more power to them, but I'm more of a guy who wants to buy a sled on Dec. 1st and put gas and oil in it and ride it Dec. 2nd with virtually no tinkering, tuning, aftermarket mods or anything.

This whole opinion is still based on really limited info and I would love for you to show me where I'm wrong because it does seem like a pretty good kid chassis actually. Do they still make them? Especially the 440 seemed really cool for kids.

Escmanaze 03-29-2018 10:44 PM

price
 
Sure, I totally understand if they feel they need to keep the price point down and they don't agree with me and think enough numbers are out there for an EVO RMK PRO in the $8k-10k range.

That's where I'm saying that even if they just did 2 things to the evo to make it the evo rmk, that would be leaps and bounds forward for me. To put the standard indy skid on it instead of the lowered skid, I would think would be cost neutral. To put the 1.75" track on it instead of the .9" track, might cost another hundred or two. Boom, there is your evo rmk. Throw it out there and watch the orders come in. You'll never see a standard model get ordered ever again out here in the west.

Think about the 90's. The only difference in an RMK or an SKS was the track length. But that was enough to make all the difference in the world and soon enough nobody in the west ever bought a standard model ever again.

To take it even farther, if they want, it seems like these days polaris is doing belt drives for about the same cost as a chaincase, so maybe that could be in play as well, and as far as gearing it down, it seems that one gear costs the same as the next gear, although maybe they charge a little more to add another part on their shelves. Still it seems like those changes could be done at a fairly small cost premium.

For a narrow stance, it would be perfect if the new 36" arms from AXYS REACT would bolt right on to the old pro chassis that the evo sits on, but if not, and it's too much work for them, that's fine. Put it out with the 39 it has now and we can put some aftermarket offset spindles on it or maybe just picky guys like me can pay for a full blown zbros kit aftermarket.

It seems like they could RMK it quite well using parts they already have on the shelf and parts that I imagine don't cost much more than the ones on the standard model. But if nothing else, the biggest two things are to un-lower it, and get some lug on there. Both seem super easy and super cheap...from my outsider perspective. :face-icon-small-win:face-icon-small-hap

Escmanaze 03-29-2018 10:55 PM

string us along
 
The other thing they can/should do out here in the west is to string us along and add one more cool thing every few years to the RMK. So let's say for now that the RMK just has the lifted skid and the 1.75" track. Then a couple years later they give it a belt drive with a gear down. Then a couple years later they give it a narrow ski stance. Then a couple years later they give it carbon overstructure and bumper. Then a couple years later they give it better boards. Then a couple years later build it on the AXYS chassis instead of the pro chassis. If they keep putting a few new things out here and there, that should help keeps sales of this thing strong even after years and years of offering the product instead of the scenario where you have strong sales for the first couple years and then everybody has one who needs one and you can't sell them anymore.

How many guys who had a perfectly good 2012 ProRMK upgraded to the 2013 pro rmk because they just had to have the belt drive, better boards, and the lost weight. Small changes, but it caused lots of people to sell the old stuff and get the new stuff.

Also, if it actually is a real half decent mountain sled, there should quickly be a pretty high rate of 12 year old running these things into trees and that would help keep sales strong as well.

All this is the opposite of what we see with the 120's where they are the exact same year after year, so there is no incentive to buy new vs. used, and they can't actually get anywhere tricky to get crashed in the first place, so they all just sit there on the used market and really drag down the new sales market. Not to mention that they have 4 stroke motors and are built bullet proof so they just last forever.

Bushwacker1 03-30-2018 08:16 PM

They should be able to make the price point by offering this sled in an rmk mode. Longer tracks cost very little more to make only due to more material. Rmk parts when mass produced and the tooling is already designed and paid for should cost the same as a trail sled. Polaris has put a large premium on the light weight parts only because we will pay the premium for them. A long track Evo on price point is possible but it would not be as light as most would want it to be. Polaris has proven they knows how to manage special orders thru snowcheck. They just need to make the standard rmk Evo and then offer the light weight pro rmk option to get it down to the 375 pound range as snow check only. Make the snow check in optional stages and then leave it up to the customer to decide how much they are willing to pay. They could also offer the up grades thru the accessory catalog and let the dealers make a few dollars also. All this has been said before. We just need Polaris to start listening.

volcano buster 03-30-2018 11:20 PM

Lightweight 550 Voyager 144 or 155...

Escmanaze 03-31-2018 09:47 PM

Shorter track
 
Call me crazy (get in line, plenty of people that have already joined that club) but I really don't think the age of kid I have in mind needs a big long 144 track. My ideal plan would involve putting my kid on a 600 144 at about the age of 14 (for my family, this age means the kid will be a little over 5 feet tall and a little over 100 pounds) but I think the concept of an evo is for kids who aren't yet even a full 5 feet tall, or maybe just barely, and kids that are still under 100 pounds, or maybe over just barely.

At that size, I just don't think a 144 will do as good of a job of TEACHING the kid how to ride as a 121 or 129, or maybe even a 136 would do. Yeah, the 144 might take him up a few more big hills or into a little deeper powder, but I think the skills would be much better learned with a little shorter track, and maybe you can try to make up for a little lost ground with some bigger paddles?

I would much rather see them stick with something smaller like the 129 or maybe even the 136 (that's pushing it), but in the cheaper indy lines now that have the old Pro chassis, it does appear that the options are still limited to either 121 or jumping all the way up to 144. Bummer.

All the more reason to make a really expensive "PRO" version of the evo RMK that is actually built on the AXYS chassis. :face-icon-small-hap:face-icon-small-hap:face-icon-small-hap:face-icon-small-win Oh man, the idea of starting this theoretical "EVO RMK PRO" on the platform of the Indy XC 129 machines that already have the good boards just makes me drool. Lighter 550 engine and associated clutch, geared down belt drive, 36" REACT arms, and the Camoplast Backcountry X2 track with all the other "little people" evo parts. Now there's a machine that could really teach a 4'8" 85 pound 10-12 year old how to ride. And it wouldn't use a single part that isn't already there.

https://i.pinimg.com/236x/d0/29/50/d...adf4990b49.jpg


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