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Project MLC [Mid-Life Crisis]

Losing it in Style

Published in the January 2011 Issue Published online: Jan 20, 2011 Feature Ryan Harris
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The graphic kit kind of says it all, doesn't it?

If there's ever a time to snap under pressure, get a new haircut, buy the newest sled on the market and turbo it and then go wild with the mods, this is it.

We went all red-sports-car with a 2011 Polaris Pro RMK 800 with a 153 track. It's the latest in mountain sled innovation and runs on the newest chassis in the industry. It's a tough sled to make better, but when you're set on bringing back the 21-year-old in you, you just have to try. You can't waste a perfectly good crisis on stock equipment.

First, we wanted enough power to leave the bad memories behind. Boondocker provided that with a pump gas non-intercooled turbo kit. Boondocker has updated its kits to provide simple, bolt-on packages that keep your sled as easy to ride and maintain as a stocker. And the install is relatively easy on the new kits. Boondocker now ships the turbo systems in two boxes. One contains the ore-assembled turbo/exhaust/oil tank and the other holds the hardware to complete installation.

How did the install go on our Project MLC? It was done by two guys in just less than two hours during the Intermountain Snowmobile Show in Salt Lake City this past October. And to prove that show install was no fluke, the sled was on the snow for a ride the next weekend with no changes. And the unique air intake design of the Boondocker turbo system keeps the charger breathing even in deep powder snow.

The Boondocker turbo uses the factory exhaust pipe and doesn't require any cutting or welding. The only cutting you'll do is a hole for the exhaust tunnel dump, which on the Pro RMK is in the right toe hold.

Anymore, running a turbo isn't about raw power. It's about making a sled capable of doing the kind of riding you want to do. We've already had seat time on Project Mid-Life Crisis and the rides have been in bottomless, heavy deep powder. We had three stock 800s plus the project sled and three guys spent the day digging sleds out repeatedly while the guy on the turbo was able to just ride all day long. You don't need to be an insane chute climber to own a turbo. It's just a way of making any good sled better.

The turbo should get us into enough trouble to satisfy the 40-something inner rebel we're all trying to suppress. But we need a few other things to make sure we get out of trouble. Things like front and rear bumpers from Skinz Protective Gear. An Air Frame seat from Skinz sheds a little weight and gave us a little room for storage, also installed at the Intermountain Snowmobile Show.

We're running Starting Line Products Powder Pro skis so that when the front end is on the snow, we can keep it under control.

You have to ride in style when you're trying to cover up a mental breakdown and we covered this sled's ride with parts from Holz Racing Products, Fox Racing Shox, Timbersled Products and Ice Age Manufacturing.

Holz sent out a set of upper and lower control arms to give the sled a lighter front end and durable performance.

We'll run Fox Float Evol shocks up front, too, for even more weight reduction.

A Timbersled Mtn. Tamer rear suspension package complete with Ice Age rails and rear axle kit and Fox shocks will give us the transfer control we want to complement the boost.

And to help us keep a firm grip on whatever direction our rash decisions will be taking us while on the run, RSI Racing is setting Project Mid-Life Crisis up with 5-inch rise handlebars (lower than stock), gel wrap grips and a new throttle block assembly and kill switch.

ArcticFX designed this version of the Broken Arrow RMK wrap, which ties the whole "I'm 40 and wish I were 20" theme together.

See you on the snow. We'll be the one with the frosted hair trying to figure out how to work an iPhone.