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Mountain Mod Mania 6

A Greg Painter Production

Published online: Feb 05, 2009 Feature
Viewed 51 time(s)

Just as in years past, this film is all about modified sleds, and of course, Greg Painter's "ultimate trailer." There were essentially three repeating elements in Mountain Mod Mania 6. Fist was the sleds, including detailed descriptions of the various sled modifications and identification of the respective aftermarket manufactures. Second was footage of the modified sleds in action, and Painter takes you to several of the premier sled completions to let you see first hand what these monster mods will do. Finally, Painter documents his road trips and own snowmobile outings throughout the film, which is a little like watching somebody else's family videos, but don't let this deter you as these are mostly introductions to the real action to come.

As in past Mountain Mod Mania films, Painter takes you to the Big Dawg and Fairview Shootouts. The main event of the shootouts is an uphill drag race. The Big Dawg shootout takes place near Whistler, BC, in late April when most people have put their sleds away for the year. This year at the end of April during the shootout it was cold. People had to dig holes in the ground to keep out of the weather, and the wind chill was mentioned to be around minus 20 degrees F. in April! Up hill drag racing doesn't get much better or more sophisticated than at the Big Dawg shootout. Any kind of mod you can think of with a lot of horsepower was on the starting line. The people with stock snowmobiles were just spectators at this event. Mike Irmen was crowned Big Dawg this year with his borrowed Impulse-turbo Yamaha Nytro, which his friend Paul Horschel built.

The Fairview Shootout was another great uphill drag race worth watching, but one sled in particular caught my attention at this event. Painter talks with a guy who built a two-stroke drag sled from an Arctic Cat which had over 400 horsepower. On asphalt the sled could go 162 mph in 8.34 seconds, and on grass do 120 mph within 500 feet and 4.34 seconds. The sled was set up with a small lug track, so it likely didn't fair to well on snow in and up hill race, but on the grass it was lighting fast. Image that, a sled that does better off the snow than on it.

My favorite segment of the DVD was YamaFest at Revelstock, BC. This event was essentially the equivalent of the Jackson Hole hill climb for four-strokes. The event took place at 1,500-vertical-foot chute referred to as "monster-chute," which this year was covered with several feet of new powder. While this competition didn't have gates that the rider must maneuver through, the climb was so steep that you can't even ride your sled back down it without going end over end. In fact, one rider got out of their line and ran up (not into) and over the top of a pretty good sized tree. The modified Yamahas used to climb monster-chute had no problem with horsepower and speed needed to conquer the mountain, but after the fist few riders the ascent started to require skill to navigate through the trenches of the previous riders. It's just amazing how deep a trench a 300-plus-horsepower sled can make. Oh, and for those that didn't make it, the mountain was not respecter of sleds, as it would destroy a $30,000 mod just as quickly as a "cheapo" sled.

Again, this movie is all about the sleds, and you won't find more sophisticated or technically radical mods in one place than in this video. On the other hand, the riding is ok, but the engineering is more impressive. In the bonus footage, Painter shows this year's upgrades to his "Ultimate Trailer." The film would likely rate PG rating for some language.