February 10, 2005

WHAT’S NEW IN RACE SLEDS




You might notice a new circuit in the race schedule section. It’s not really a new circuit, but rather a renamed one. The previous Warrior Freestyle and Snocross circuit has been renamed Mountain States Snowmobile Racing. As you can see from the schedule the circuit sanctions races in Wyoming and Colorado. By the time you read this, MSSR will have had its first race (in Colorado) but the season stretches to April 16-17. MSSR is a WSA regional affiliate.
Sled Fest 2005 is scheduled for February in Reno, NV. Rather than waiting until the end of the season, the Reno-Sparks Convention & Visitor’s Authority has moved up the dates of Sled Fest 2005 to Feb. 10-13. This will allow winter visitors to enjoy this special snowmobiling vacation during the best time of winter. It will also coincide with an established outdoors show that promises to make the event bigger and better.
This year SnoWest Magazine and the American Sledhead Association will both be involved with sponsorship efforts. SnoWest publisher Steve Janes said he welcomes the opportunity to expose more outdoor enthusiasts to the sport of snowmobiling. ASA will hold its annual meeting in conjunction with the event, offering SledHeads from across the country the chance to meet and ride together during the four-day event.
Sled Fest is open to the general public. And although there will be some events specifically for ASA members, Sled Fest promises something for everyone and will be held at several venues encompassing the entire Lake Tahoe region, both on the Nevada and California side. The consumer tradeshow will be held at the Reno-Sparks Convention Center. For additional information on the event and special hotel packages visit
www.renolaketahoe.com.

2005 Arctic Cat Sno Pro
Arctic Cat has played an aggressive role in snocross racing over the past decade. Much of the technology on its production line was derived on the racetrack. The two best examples of that are the Firecat line (modeled after the 2002 Sno Pro) and the 2005 M-series mountain sleds (with design hints of the 2004 Sno Pro Open class factory racer).
So a look at the newest race hardware is really a glimpse into the future for production design.
What’s new on the 2005 Sno Pro? Starting with the engine, Suzuki engineers changed the crankshaft design to reduce weight and rotating mass. A lighter crankshaft spins faster and improves throttle response.
The exhaust pipe is ceramic coated and offers improved bottom-end and mid-range torque for the 440 and the exhaust system is lighter with more consistent heat.
A lightweight brake disc cools better than the old design and reduces rotating mass in the drive train, further aiding acceleration. A 17-wide chain and new gears and chain adjuster are more durable than previous models.
The new one-piece carburetor boot extension helps seal off the intake system from snow and dirt.
Outside the hood, Team Arctic has switched to C&A Ultra Pro skis for improved control. Fox Float AirShox up front were found to offer better rebound and compression adjustability.
Perhaps the biggest change to the ‘05 racer is the improved rear suspension. A new Slide Action front arm system features a front fixed shaft that bolts to the tunnel. The top of the front arm has a U-shaped slot that fits over a fixed shaft allowing half an inch of sliding movement. The rear arm is now coupled, with  a seven-position transfer system. Also new is a revised cross-link shock valving setup, which is

said to greatly improve bump absorption, traction, pitch control and cornering speed. New slide rails have extended rail braces.
The new track is lighter and features a 3-inch pitch. The 1.7-inch lug height coupled with extrovert drivers should make for a reliable system with plenty of traction.
An adjustable steering system and spindle assembly will give racers tighter turning radius and steering ratio with reduced driver fatigue. New gripper seat material helps keep the driver in place.
The controls feature an improved tether switch mounting location and better throttle cable and brake line routing. With a stronger dash consol that supports the belt guard better, durability should be improved overall.
Arctic Cat will again make a limited build of open-class factory race sleds with 800cc race motors that produce around 160 hp.

2005 Polaris Pro-XR
The biggest news in the pits this year is the introduction of Polaris’ radically changed Pro-XR. The shocking new design looks nothing like the previous Edge-based Pro-X and doesn’t really look all that much like the new Fusion. That’s because the race sled’s cockpit has been moved forward—two inches farther forward than the most forward position of the Fusion’s Rider Select setting. The bodywork is wrapped as closely around the chassis and engine compartment as possible, giving the sled a slim and lightweight look and feel.
What did the Roseau Race Team do to the ’05 Pro-XR? It’s easier to go over what they didn’t do. They used hardly any parts off the ’04 racer. The engine features a new crankcase with larger intake, new cylinders with improved exhaust ports and a new head design. V-Force reed cages are part of the improved mid-range and 6-percent increase in top-end horsepower. The Dragon holeshot button returns for you holeshot artists. And the exhaust pipe is ceramic coated for improved heat control.
The IQ IFS front suspension, derived from last year’s Open class racer and the production IQ chassis, is more resistant to bottoming and is more predictable and speed adaptive in corners, allowing the driver to go faster where it counts. The IQ IFS is lighter than the Edge’s trailing arm design, reducing unsprung weight.
The shocks have a progressive motion ratio and the IQ IFS’ unique variable castor improves stability over rough terrain. A two-piece aluminum/steel race spindle is designed to hold up to the abuse of a snocross track.
Part of the front suspension’s ability to resist bottoming comes from the same non-parallel control arm design that makes the 900 RMK and Fusion so great. The unequal length arms eliminate scrub and bump steer. The front suspension has an impressive 11inchs of travel—two more than the ‘04 Pro-X. New Walker Evans shocks with 16 adjustments on the clicker have 30 percent more adjustability.
As we mentioned earlier, the ‘05 Pro-XR has a new over-the-engine steering system with a 40-inch turning radius. The adjustable steering post lets the rider-forward steering be matched to the driver.
A new two-step seat improves transitions from sitting to standing. The ‘05’s seat is an inch taller than the ‘04’s (the front is 8.5 inches high; the rear 10.5), and is narrow for easy driver maneuverability. The console slopes away from the driver for increased knee clearance. The ‘05 Pro-XR has adjustable toe clips too, further extending the adjustability of this new machine.
The entire chassis is made of 4130 chromoly tubing for strength and weight savings. The tunnel is an inch narrower this year and the extra space has been added to the running boards. An internal front bumper eliminates the bumper being caught in the snow. The chassis’ ground clearance has increased by 2 inches.
The IQ rear suspension features a new RTS control arm and gives the rear of the machine 14 inches of travel. A combination front cooler/motor mount is stronger and eliminates weight. The rear cooler was redesigned to be wider and thinner to eliminate the need to cut tracks.
A new Cyclone master cylinder works with the proven Phantom brake. Easy access side panels and a 3.5-gallon fuel tank round out the features of the ‘05 Pro-XR—which touts a 15 percent reduction in parts.
ing comes from the same non-parallel control arm design that makes the 900 RMK and Fusion so great. The unequal length arms eliminate scrub and bump steer. The front suspension has an impressive 11inchs of travel—two more than the ‘04 Pro-X. New Walker Evans shocks with 16 adjustments on the clicker have 30 percent more adjustability.
As we mentioned earlier, the ‘05 Pro-XR has a new over-the-engine steering system with a 40-inch turning radius. The adjustable steering post lets the rider-forward steering be matched to the driver.
A new two-step seat improves transitions from sitting to standing. The ‘05’s seat is an inch taller than the ‘04’s (the front is 8.5 inches high; the rear 10.5), and is narrow for easy driver maneuverability. The console slopes away from the driver for increased knee clearance. The ‘05 Pro-XR has adjustable toe clips too, further extending the adjustability of this new machine.
The entire chassis is made of 4130 chromoly tubing for strength and weight savings. The tunnel is an inch narrower this year and the extra space has been added to the running boards. An internal front bumper eliminates the bumper being caught in the snow. The chassis’ ground clearance has increased by 2 inches.
The IQ rear suspension features a new RTS control arm and gives the rear of the machine 14 inches of travel. A combination front cooler/motor mount is stronger and eliminates weight. The rear cooler was redesigned to be wider and thinner to eliminate the need to cut tracks.
A new Cyclone master cylinder works with the proven Phantom brake. Easy access side panels and a 3.5-gallon fuel tank round out the features of the ‘05 Pro-XR—which touts a 15 percent reduction in parts.

2005 Ski-Doo      
MXZ-X
With Polaris stealing much of the spotlight, Ski-Doo has been working on improving its 440 racer. Although the chassis has remained mostly unchanged, the adage that says “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” certainly applies to the reigning WSA Pro Stock and Pro Open championship-winning machine. Most improvements are aimed at bettering the MXZ-X’s reliability.
New-for-2005 features include new and improved clutch calibration and a new MBL drive belt that grips the sheaves better for improved acceleration, better backshift and improved reliability.
Also, a new, stronger chaincase holds a new bottom gear and bearing for increased reliability of the chain and drive system.
The drive sprockets are re-designed to be more efficient in turning the track. Speaking of the track, the latest version is fully-clipped.
Under the hood lies the latest in electronic engine controls. The new Engine Control Module (ECM) and ignition calibration produce more torque and power off the start than last year’s racer.
The front suspension has received the new link-type sway bar, adapted from the 2005 Mach Z, which reduces weight and improves the 440’s handling.
The rear suspension has been upgraded to the SC-4, which is designed for more driver-centered positioning. The new skid helps better control weight transfer while improving bump absorption and reducing rear kick.
Aside from that, the 2005 MXZ-X also received new seat material with a better grip, stronger ski loops and lighter spring material.








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Best Western Sicamous Inn


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