December 6, 2003

Product Review



Holz Racing Products Summit Rev

Whether riding on or off the trail, we like a smooth ride. We want a suspension that works with us, not against us. And we want a suspension that works in the deep snow as well as through the moguls we’ve got to fight to get to our favorite riding areas.
That’s why we jumped at the chance to try a Holz Racing Products-equipped Ski-Doo Summit Rev when the offer came around last May. We’ve ridden other sleds with the HRP front and rear suspension and we liked them so were anxious to see what Mark Holz could do with the Summit Rev. We took our stock Summit Rev along, just for comparison. We actually like the ride of our stock sled and were thinking it performed pretty well in the rough stuff.
Holz Racing Products has carved out its niche in the snowmobile industry with front and rear suspensions which can significantly improve the stock ride.
For the record, the Holz Summit Rev came with a new HRP A-arm front suspension kit and coil over rear suspension. The A-arm front suspension kit features 4130 chromoly tig-welded construction and increases ski stance to 41 inches with the skis centered on the spindles. HRP’s claim is that the A-arm kit improves steering, stability of the sled and overall handling. The front suspension kit includes powdercoated upper and lower A-arms, a pair of lightweight HRP tie rods and new ski spacers, which make for a 40-, 41- or 42-inch ski stance. The front suspension saves 6 lbs. over stock.
The rear coil over suspension removes 10 lbs. of unsprung weight, compared to a stock Rev, while improving the deep snow performance. The kit has tig-welded chromoly construction, greasable delrin pivot bearings, Fox Zero Pro aluminum shocks, dual rate springs and a powdercoat finish.

Highmarks
To get to the riding area, we had to pound through 2-3 foot moguls for a couple of miles before we were able to get to some decent off-trail riding. The HRP Summit Rev definitely handled the moguls better than our stock sled. Sometimes, when you’re trying to pound moguls like we were, you (and the sled) get a little sloppy and sometimes get out of whack as you try to maneuver through the craters. We won’t say the HRP sled never prevented us from getting a little sideways, but it was minimal at best. The front and rear suspension worked well together, with both absorbing the hits, leaving us in control of the sled, instead of the other way around. There wasn’t a lot of powder the day we rode, but when we did find some soft stuff, the rear suspension really worked well in allowing the sled to do its thing, instead of dragging it down (and sucking out the horsepower) or catapulting us into the atmosphere when we came across an unseen obstacle under the snow.
While all that is well and good, the most telling difference between the two sleds came when we headed back to the truck across the same mogul field. We were racing back (faster than we went in) and you could easily ride faster on the HRP Summit Rev than our stock sled. The handling was that much better. A nice side benefit of the Holz suspension kits is the weight savings. It makes an already light machine just that much more nimble.
Tumbles
You have to pay for a ride that good—to the tune of a little more than $1,600.
What It’ll Cost You
The Ski-Doo Summit Rev A-arm kit retails for $425 while the Ski-Doo Summit Rev rear suspension kit retails for $1,199.
How To Get A Hold Of HRP Suspension Kits
Contact Holz Racing Products (360) 398-7006.







Kimpex
Hill's Resort


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